chicagovm
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DVUplinks VLAN configuration

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Greetings,


I have trunk ports which are set to VLAN 40 and 44. When I create the DSwitch1, the DVUplinks policy settings set as VLAN Trunking with a VLAN Trunk range of 0-4094. When I try goto Edit Settings > Policies > VLAN ( VLAN Trunking is set and is greyed out. )

Does this VLAN type come from the configuration knowing the physical port are set to VLAN trunks?

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MKguy
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This is normal, you don't need to worry about the uplinks. It just means that the uplinks can receive frames form every VLAN. But what really matters is how you configure the actual port groups, and how you attach vNICs to it. Without an appropriate port group and a corresponding active vNIC attached to it, frames from a certain VLAN will not be forwarded anywhere.

-- http://alpacapowered.wordpress.com

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MKguy
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This is normal, you don't need to worry about the uplinks. It just means that the uplinks can receive frames form every VLAN. But what really matters is how you configure the actual port groups, and how you attach vNICs to it. Without an appropriate port group and a corresponding active vNIC attached to it, frames from a certain VLAN will not be forwarded anywhere.

-- http://alpacapowered.wordpress.com
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chriswahl
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The DVUplink port group will always get configured as a VLAN trunk with a range of 0-4094. Traffic would be filtered by the VDS after passing through the network adapters based on the VLAN assignments made on your port groups.

While there's typically no reason to adjust the trunk range on your DVUplink ports, I've put together a post that goes a little bit deeper into the why and the how.

Limiting the DVUplink VLAN Range on a vSphere Distributed Switch (VDS) - Wahl Network

VCDX #104 (DCV, NV) ஃ WahlNetwork.com ஃ @ChrisWahl ஃ Author, Networking for VMware Administrators
chicagovm
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Enthusiast

Thanks all!


Question - If you have 3 hosts with 2 UPLINKs each available for use. How many UPLINKs should you initially configure the one DSwitch with 3 VLANs for?

6 or 2 ?

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MKguy
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Question - If you have 3 hosts with 2 UPLINKs each available for use. How many UPLINKs should you initially configure the one DSwitch with 3 VLANs for?

6 or 2 ?

You set the number of dvuplinks to the maximum number of physical uplinks that will participate in the in this dvSwitch of a host. Each assigned physical uplink of a host will then map to a dvuplink port. So in your case with 2 physical NICs per host, you should configure 2 dvuplinks on the dvSwitch.

-- http://alpacapowered.wordpress.com
chicagovm
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Enthusiast

Your great!

OK - one last one while I have your attention.. Smiley Happy


If you had a PG 70_VMOTION and 2 available uplinks.. would you keep them both as active as shown below or one as standby and the other active.

( I also have 2 other PG's using the same UPLINKs )

VMotionPG.jpg

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MKguy
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That depends on a lot of factors, your constraints and what you're trying to achieve. In case it's about mutli-NIC vMotion, which doesn't seem to be the case, refer to this article:

VMware KB:    Multiple-NIC vMotion in vSphere 5 

Usually you'd dedicate a physical NIC/team to a vMotion vmkernel NIC and don't mix it with any other traffic (except for management traffic on another VLAN, which is lightweight traffic unless you do network-based backups through that interface as well). vMotion can easily saturate a single 10Gbe link. Can't you dedicate another NIC for vMotion?

If not then you might want to consider setting the vMotion port group to active on uplink1 and standby on uplink2, and the other port groups vice-versa.

Or you can use Network IO control and traffic shaping to limit the bandwidth used for vMotion traffic. There's also load-based teaming policy, but it only distributes traffic at 30 second intervals.

You should read some more of Chris' highly informative articles on vSphere networking, or buy his book while you're at it:

http://wahlnetwork.com/tag/vds/

-- http://alpacapowered.wordpress.com
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