baber
Expert
Expert

Implement vSAN with 2vmkernel in LACP type

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As I know the best type of network policy that recommend to use for vSAN is LACP . because it can use both pnic . Now is that means we implement such as attach pic ? both vmkernel ip address (1.1.1.1 and 2.2.2.2 this is just POC) are in same subnet . Is that correct ?

 

 

 

 

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depping
Leadership
Leadership

let's start at the beginning, why are you doing all of this? are you saturating a single link? If not, then don't bother with it. Things will just become more complex, and chances of it making a difference in smaller environments are close to zero!

1) that is something you can do, but it also means you need to route between the subnets, and most people would isolate their vSAN VLANs

2) Yes, that is my recommendation, keep it simple, unless you have very specific reasons not to

3) You always need a vmkernel interface per host, and those will need a unique IP, but it is easiest to have them in the same subnet

4) multiple vmkernel interfaces are sometimes used by customers who want to create a setup which resembles their fibre channel configurations, it is barely used to be honest, and it doesn't balance load across those interfaces too well, so I would not recommend it.

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IRIX201110141
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

A LACP vsan setup is far away from recommend because its the most complicated setup and leave enough room for failures on both sides of the cable.

 

Yes your screen looks ok and yes both VMKs needs to be in the same subnet. It doesnt mean that you also configure the other parameters right. The officicial doc cover the whole setup and showing a loot of screenshots.

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/7.0/vsan-network-design-guide/GUID-5DEF613E-9FBD-45E1-A01B...

 

Regards,
Joerg

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CyberNils
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Most of the time we don't recommend LACP with vSAN due to added complexity and vendor lock-in. If you need better performance, buy faster NICs. LACP may be an option if you are sure you can support it. 



Nils Kristiansen
https://cybernils.net/
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depping
Leadership
Leadership

I am not sure this makes sense. Are you planning on making two vmkernel interfaces per host and then do LACP? Or just 1 vmkernel interface per host and then LACP?

We have a whole document describing vSAN network recommendations here:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/7.0/com.vmware.vsphere.vsan-planning.doc/GUID-031F9637-EE2...

I think the key things to note are:

  1. With LACP, depending on the number of IPs (etc) used, you may not see an increase of throughput
  2. When using multiple vmkernel interfaces per host, they NEED to be in a different subnet!
  3. "Route based on originating virtual port" is by far most used, and most just go to 25Gbps or higher when possible.
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baber
Expert
Expert

1- for use LACP I (use aggregate bandwidth) created two vmkernel on each host with different subnet . Is that correct ?

2 - As I understood your recommendation is Route based on originating virtual port . Is that correct ? I have 2pnic 10G for vSAN traffic

3 - If you recommend use Route based on originating virtual port . Do i have to create two vmkernel with different IP for vSAN ?

4- When have to create two vmkernel and when just one is enough ?

Please mark helpful or correct if my answer resolved your issue.
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depping
Leadership
Leadership

let's start at the beginning, why are you doing all of this? are you saturating a single link? If not, then don't bother with it. Things will just become more complex, and chances of it making a difference in smaller environments are close to zero!

1) that is something you can do, but it also means you need to route between the subnets, and most people would isolate their vSAN VLANs

2) Yes, that is my recommendation, keep it simple, unless you have very specific reasons not to

3) You always need a vmkernel interface per host, and those will need a unique IP, but it is easiest to have them in the same subnet

4) multiple vmkernel interfaces are sometimes used by customers who want to create a setup which resembles their fibre channel configurations, it is barely used to be honest, and it doesn't balance load across those interfaces too well, so I would not recommend it.

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