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marek1712
Contributor
Contributor

ESXi 4 on Server 2.0.2 [Win7] - shutdown when trying to run VM

Hello.

Since it's my first post here I'm sorry for any mistakes.

To the point then.

I have VMWare Server 2.0.2 istalled on my PC. Recently wanted to try some bare-metal solution and jumped straight to the VMWare ESXi 4 (4.1 had some issue related to keyboard under VM).

So I've installed it into Server 2.0.2. Next, I had to edit .vmx file (did it like shown here):

Unfortunately, when I try to run a test VM with Windows XP, ESXi crashes. Log file in the attachment.

Any ideas? Thanks in advance

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a_p_
Leadership
Leadership

Welcome to the Community,

Even though guestOS = “vmkernel″ is recognized by VMware Server, try to use guestOS = “other-64″ instead. You could also put the second virtual disk on a separate SCSI controller (e.g. SCSI 1:0).

Not sure if this helps, but maybe worth a try.

André

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marek1712
Contributor
Contributor

Unfortunately, there's no change.

EDIT:

I've just seen this:

http://communities.vmware.com/message/1498397

Damn, even if Tomcat is slow, I'm used to VMWare Server 2

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golddiggie
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Champion

IF you're going to nest ESXi you really should use VMware Workstation 7.x to do it... Do keep in mind, that any way you nest ESX/ESXi you won't be able to run any 64 bit OS within that nested host.

Otherwise, get some compliant hardware (from the VMware HCL or listed as 100% compatible on either vm-help or ultimatewhitebox web sites) and run it properly... Keep in mind, this is intended to run on SERVER hardware, not desktop grade hardware. The boards are chock-full of posts from people trying to 'go ghetto' and install onto either desktop systems or boxes they tossed together (often without proper research of the hardware) having major issues of all kinds.

For compatible hardware, make sure the core system is on the HCL, the processors are on the HCL for the current release (4.0 u1 and u2 as well as 4.1) as well as the hard drive controller (if you're going to do any RAID levels, at all, make sure the controller is a HARDWARE RAID controller with BBWC before you get it), network controllers, you have enough physical RAM in the host to do the job, etc... Also read the (readily available) documentation for installing VMware ESX/ESXi as well as the additional components such as vCenter. Read the configuration maximums document too (VMFS datastores max out at 2TB-512B) before you even start... Doing this will answer a LOT of questions you would otherwise have. Far too many people skip over either some, or all, of that and post up questions that really would have not even been posted had they did some reading first...

Personally, before I purchased my current host hardware I took the time to ensure that it WOULD run ESX/ESXi... I went with a major brand (Dell) getting components that are also inside their true servers to ensure things would go correctly... I also used the 30 day return policy to ensure things were correct. I even went so far as to have the same RAID controller that was used in their servers installed (at the factory) as well as 15k RPM SAS hard drives for the boot array (a mirrored pair). Couple that with E5405 Xeon's (a pair of them), complient (Intel) Gb NIC's, enough RAM (for now, need to order more since 16GB isn't enough anymore with what I want/need to run) and such... I've gone from ESXi 3.5 all the way up to 4.1 and expect to be able to install the next release too (unless something drastic changes). I'm also planning on getting a SAN in place here to house the VM's so that I have enough space to do what I need. When I do get another host, that will make things much easier... I also, just over a year ago, or so, picked up a fully managed Gb network switch (ProCurve 2510G-24) that has full CLI management on it (not just the web GUI)... Proper network hardware is another key element whenever you start getting serious about using enterprise grade virtualization technology... ESX/ESXi falls under that category, VMware Server does not...

DO keep in mind, if you do actually get serious about running ESX/ESXi, you'll need a regular system to run the vSphere Client software on in order to administrate the host, edit the VM hardware, and open console windows to directly access the VM's (other than using RDP for Windows, or trying VNC for Linux systems).

There really is a LOT you can do with ESX/ESXi when properly configured and you have a decent setup... You just need to be prepared to spend a bit of money to do it right. Going the cheap route will get you poor results.

VMware VCP4

Consider awarding points for "helpful" and/or "correct" answers.

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marek1712
Contributor
Contributor

Thank you for the information.

As I mentioned, I wanted to test it out before getting to teh serious usage. I'm fully aware there may be incompatibilities and hardware should be matched to meet VMWare's needs, not otherwise.

I use Server at my home PC - it's convenient for such environment (and only for that; no automation options and ability to create one snapshot per machine disqualify it for production use).

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