1 Reply Latest reply on Oct 9, 2015 2:07 PM by Stingray_City

    Don't delete vmdks accidentaly if you are using ESXi 5.5 or 6

    continuum Guru User Moderators vExpert

      In the past I was able to help lots of folks that accidentaly deleted vmdks - in many cases they were recoverable with the help of vmfs-fuse.
      The chances for a recovery of an accidentaly deleted vmdk from a VMFS-volume that has been created with ESXi 5.5 and 6 have changed from "quite good" to "almost hopeless".

       

      So if you plan to accidentaly delete vmdks with 5.5 or 6 make sure to use thick provisioned vmdks and create those vmdks while the VMFS-volume is still almost empty.

       

      The latest versions do a much better job when deleting files as the previous versions before.

       

      Watch out ...

       

      Ulli

        • 1. Re: Don't delete vmdks accidentaly if you are using ESXi 5.5 or 6
          Stingray_City Lurker

          Sorry to Hi-Jack this Thread but I'm new to the vmware forums,

           

          Unfortunately today I am one of those poor folks that deleted a vmdk from a VM using the edit settings option. This is what happened. I created a new hard disk using the edit settings option from Vpshere Client on the VM. The VM already had 2 Virtual hard disks and I decided to add a 3rd. I selected all defaults created the 3rd hard Disk and then at at a later point decided I wanted to free up disk space on my data store and decided to deleted the 3rd hard Disk on this VM. Once again I edited settings for the VM selected Hard Disk 3 and removed and deleted it from the datastore.

           

          It turns out when I initially created the 3rd hard disk, it labeled itself as Hard Disk 2 and Hard Disk 3 was in fact the VMDK that contained important data??. The VMDK I deleted was Thick Provision Lazy Zeroed and was created while my Esxi hosts were at version 5.0 ( I have upgraded to ESXi 5.5 Update 03 in the last week). I spent a few hours with vmware support and they recommended that I look at using Kroll On Track to recover the VMDK from the SAn where the datastore resides. Kroll on track is way out of my budget and after scouring these forums I see that there may be some alternative options. Is there any way I can recover this VMDK and get important folders and files from it?

           

          Thanks for any help that you could provide.