1 Reply Latest reply on Jun 4, 2013 8:50 AM by johnrix

    EULA text causing build failure

    johnrix Lurker

      I received some EULA text to apply to my VMWare Studio build profiles today and applied this accordingly. Now when building the VMs, I get the following error output at the point of packaging the OVA file:

       

      29/05/2013 19:49:26 [info] Finalizing the vm.

      29/05/2013 19:49:26 [info] Packaging the vm.

      29/05/2013 19:58:10 [error] Exporting VM in ova format

      ; /opt/vmware/www/build/myprofile.1/exports/ovf/myprofile_OVF10.ovf:1: parser error : Document is empty

      ^

      /opt/vmware/www/build/myprofile.1/exports/ovf/myprofile_OVF10.ovf:1: parser error : Start tag expected, '<' not found

      ^

      Failure: xmlParseFile() failed

       

      Has anybody else encountered this and found a workaround?

       

      So far, I've verified removing the EULA text I had and applying some simple placeholder text resolves the issue. Also, including only the first couple of paragraphs (and even repeating those numerous times) similarly resolves the issue, so it seems to be something specific in the remainder of the text that is causing the issue, though I have not yet identified what. The process of elimination is very slow when builds take 45 minutes to complete (I guess it could be worse!). For what its worth, there are no angle brackets in the text!

       

      I'm using VMWare Studio 2.6 and building RHEL 6.4 based VMs.

       

      Thanks,

      John

        • 1. Re: EULA text causing build failure
          johnrix Lurker

          In case anybody else stumbles upon this, the issue proved to be caused by an apparent bug in VMWare Studio's handling of HTML entities in the EULA text as far as I can figure. My initial finding was that removing all of the text from a specific semi-colon and onwards resolved the problem, though there were previous semi-colons in the text not causing any problems.

           

          Replacing all of the & characters in the EULA text though ultimately solved the problem, so my best guess is the semi-colon in question was the first one following an ampersand character somewhere earlier in the text (I didn't go back to check afterwards).