6 Replies Latest reply on Sep 8, 2008 8:55 AM by LKPDsmith

    Good, Slim Linux Distro?

    alphadog4 Novice

       

       

       

       

      What is a good, slim (low memory footprint) Linux distro to run VM Server on? I am debating whether to make the host Windows Server 2008 or some Linux distro. I am assuming is will not spend much time in the host except to maintain VMWare and images, so frills are unnecessary. What are poeple using?

       

       

       

       

       

      Thanks.

       

       

        • 1. Re: Good, Slim Linux Distro?
          rhsoftware Hot Shot

           

          Every Linux-Distribution which is supported from VMware if you make a minimal install

          and remove all packages and services you do not need.

           

           

          I have running fedora9, ubuntu and debian as guests and without X they need all between 25 and 35 MB RAM, so there is not really any difference

           

           

          • 2. Re: Good, Slim Linux Distro?
            10nico Enthusiast

            This is quite a FAQ!

             

            I use debian etch very minimal install: I deselect everything in tasksel during the setup, and afterwards install only the vmware server needed packages. Ultra slim!

             

             

             

            I also use centos 5 following the same procedure, I even remove the "base" packages, to slim things down further. Then I install only the really needed files. Very slim!

             

             

             

            I don't even consider windows as an host, it simply doesn't compare:

             

             

             

             

             

            • has a huge memory (ram AND disks) footprint

             

             

             

            • needs a reboot quite too often

             

             

             

            • needs to be updated with windowsupdate/wsus ans so needs to be rebooted (and when you reboot you need to take down ALL of the guests!)

             

             

             

            • you also need to pay a license

             

            Need I to go on?

             

             

             

            Live long and prosper,

             

             

             

            Michele

            • 3. Re: Good, Slim Linux Distro?
              Paul Thomas Master

              Can you run ESXi on your hardware?  As this is now free, it may be the best solution if you want high performance from your VMs and don't want to use the host OS for anything else.

              • 4. Re: Good, Slim Linux Distro?
                alphadog4 Novice

                Did not realize ESX was now free. This may be the best way to go since I don't have to worry about anything. Thanks.

                • 5. Re: Good, Slim Linux Distro?
                  zervin Novice

                   

                  On Vmware ESX - It may/may not be the best solution. I considered using it myself, but without all of the paid addons, there are some well documented limitations. I prefer having access to the host os directly for my own reasons. I also do not like the idea of ONLY being able to manage the server from a remote windows machine with the vm client installed.

                   

                   

                   

                   

                   

                  On Slim Linux - I would stick with either a minimum install of centos5/redhat, or go with one of the Ubuntu Server LTS builds. Both allow easy installation without the need to build modules, and are supported. Debian Etch isnt "technically" supported last I checked. Both weigh in at about 20-25MB ram running.

                   

                   

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Good, Slim Linux Distro?
                    LKPDsmith Novice

                    I posted a document that details the installation of VM Server on Centos 5.2 using the a basic linux OS footprint. The host linux system only has a command prompt sign on and is managed through the web interface Webmin.  The VM Server must be remotely mangaged using the web client or VIClient. It is about as basic as you can go. You might check it out on the "Documents" tab. Good luck.

                    1 person found this helpful