2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 13, 2008 5:44 PM by rrdharan

    Host machine x64 or x32 Windows Server 2003 Ent R2

    icehckyplyr22 Enthusiast

       

      Should I run Windows Server 2003 Ent R2 x32 or x64 for my host machine? I plan to run both x32 and x64 both 2003 & 2008 VM's

       

       

      I will be using VMWare Server 2.0 RC1

       

       

      What would be the benifits of running x64?

       

       

      My system is the following:

       

       

      Intel Xeon X3210 Kentsfield 2.13GHz 2 x 4MB L2 Cache LGA 775 105W Quad-Core Processor

       

       

      SUPERMICRO MBD-X7SBL-LN2 LGA 775 Intel 3200 Micro ATX Server Motherboard

       

       

      8 GB's of DDR2 RAM (I will not go beyond this amount of memory)

       

       

       

       

       

        • 1. Re: Host machine x64 or x32 Windows Server 2003 Ent R2
          rhsoftware Hot Shot

          Take the x86_64 as host

          AFAIK are the vt-extensions of the cpu not available on i386 and if x86_64 guest would run on i386 this would be much slower because vmware can't run cpu-commands directly without emulation

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Host machine x64 or x32 Windows Server 2003 Ent R2
            Expert
            rhsoftware wrote:

            Take the x86_64 as host

            AFAIK are the vt-extensions of the cpu not available on i386 and if x86_64 guest would run on i386 this would be much slower because vmware can't run cpu-commands directly without emulation

             

            I agree with the recommendation, but your justification is inaccurate.

             

            Guest performance is not generally affected in a dramatic way by the bitness of your host OS as you described. We take direct control of the CPU and any of its capabilities are available to us regardless of the bitness of your host O/S. We can and do run 64-bit guests on 32-bit host OSes all the time, and it's a very common use case for our customers as well as internally.

             

            That having been said, most 64-bit host OSes use more than 3GB of physical memory in a much more clean way that can sometimes yield better performance e.g. in I/O intensive workloads, depending on your hardware, drivers and the particulars of the OS (i.e. which particular Linux, Windows or MacOS version you're running).

             

            With VMware Server and our other "hosted products" (Workstation, Player, Fusion), we rely on the efficiency of the host I/O subsystem since we don't have our own drivers or I/O stack (unlike on ESX where we control everything). So, if your 64-bit host OS can do I/O faster than its 32-bit partner, then you should pick the 64-bit OS.