Alexey_78
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

vSphere 6.5 shows MSA 2050 4.360 TB volumes as 4TB.

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Hello All,

We have configured vSphere 6.5 to use iSCSI vou,es from MSA 2052.

But weird thing that 4.360 TB volumes visible like 4TB.

Why is that?

Thank you

1 Solution

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a_p_
Leadership
Leadership

The MSA reports the sizes as marketing sizes (Base 10), but there's an option to change it to Base 2, i.e. the real technical size.

Please take a look at e.g. https://support.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=emr_na-c01762974

That description may not be for for your exact MSA model, but the modification steps should be similar.


André

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a_p_
Leadership
Leadership

The MSA reports the sizes as marketing sizes (Base 10), but there's an option to change it to Base 2, i.e. the real technical size.

Please take a look at e.g. https://support.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=emr_na-c01762974

That description may not be for for your exact MSA model, but the modification steps should be similar.


André

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Alexey_78
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

What you mean marketing size.

MSA shows right one as that is realy size of disk I've inserted there.

3x1.2TB+800GB=4.4TB

When I did created storage on vSphere it showed 4.090 TB.

Where is 300+ GB?

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a_p_
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Leadership

Where is 300+ GB?

It's in the maths, i.e. the conversion from TB to TiB.

Maybe Units converter - convert TB into TiB can help to explain this better.

Simply enter 4.4 TB TiB into the input filed, and you'll see that you end up with ~4TiB.

Btw. it's the same for the disks that you mentioned. A 1.2TB disk has a capacity of ~1.09TiB.

André

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Alexey_78
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

So that means vSphere shows in TiB?

Why then not to write TiB intead of TB.

Confusing things.

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a_p_
Leadership
Leadership

So that means vSphere shows in TiB?

Yes, they show the real technical size.

Why then not to write TiB intead of TB.

Sorry, I can't answer this.

It's indeed confusing to have such a distinction anyway. In the early IT times 1kB equaled 1,024 Bytes, and nobody ever thought of 1kB = 1,000 Bytes, or s.th. like TB vs. TiB.

André

TomHowarth
Leadership
Leadership

as Andre has stated this is the difference between a base 2 (binary) Terabyte and a base 10 (Decimal) Terabyte. The former used by computing systems to denote capacity and the later by Marketing departments to inflate their capacity.

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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TomHowarth
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Andre, those were purer times before marketing kidnapped, the technical space with verbal athletics.

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410