luieri
Contributor
Contributor

VMWare ESXi 7.0.3 datastore and raid1 for vm

Hi,

I have the following configuration:

Supermicro X10DRH-CT onboard controller Broadcom 3108 SATA/SAS3 without battery (write-through):

2 ssd kingoston enterprise 480gb,

4 ssd enterprice 960gb,

4 hd 1.2tb sas 10k;

4 vm with medium usage and are domain controllers, web servers, generic servers.

 

I think to use the 2 ssd 480 in raid 1 for esxi installation and create 4 more raid1 (with the remaining ssd/hd) witch 4 separate datastores one on each raid1 for each vm.

In your experience, the performance is acceptable?

 

for another dedicated host esxi only for Exchange 2019, recommend this disks configuration:

Disk C operating system
Disk D Exchange executables
Disk E code
Disk F database
Disk G logs relating to the databases of disk F

can I create 5 datastores on 5 raid1 with 10 ssd/hd?

 

Thanks for the help

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compdigit44
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

This is local storage correct? If so, will it be shared to another host for HA? As for performance, local storage is great if the hosting server has the CPU, memory, etc.. resource overhead to cover it. Have you calculated your VM's average IOPS? Also having a battery backup would be a good idea.

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luieri
Contributor
Contributor

Storage is local not shared with other host, host with 2 CPUs E5-2620 v4 @ 2.10GHz, 128gb ram;

how do I calculate average IOPS the vm's?

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compdigit44
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

The is for the following article... 

https://serverfault.com/questions/368708/how-to-measure-iops-one-virtual-machine-on-vmware-esx

https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/1008205

 

  1. From the CLI run esxtop and press d to switch to disk mode. The field CMD/s shows you current IOPS.
  2. From the vSphere GUI go the machine in question and then performance tab, you can switch that to disk or datastore mode and view current activity there. You can also look at this view on a per datastore level and per host as well as per VM.
  3. If you're feeling really adventurous this can also be done with PowerCLI to drill down a little more: http://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-13523
  4. Download the free version of VMTurbo, install it on your vCenter server, and allow it to analyse your VMWare environment.
  5. Finally, SANs often have a way of telling this form their own GUIs.
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