Mike_Pownall
Contributor
Contributor

VM .vswp file size - zero.

Hi,

I've been investigating performance problems with one of our VM's and noticed that the vmname-nnnnnn.vswp file size is zero bytes even though the VM is running.

This doesn't look right to me, I thought the size of the file represented the amount of memory allocated to the VM. In our case 4096mb.

Has anyone seen this before? and could this be contributing to our poor performance?

Thanks in advance.

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7 Replies
NTurnbull
Expert
Expert

Hi Mike, the .vswp file size is the difference between the memory reservation for the vm and the size of the memory allocated to it. So it seems that your memory reservation is 4096.

As to the performance issue, out of interest how many vCPU's have you allocated to this vm and how many processors do you have?

Thanks,

Neil

Thanks, Neil
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pramodupadhyay5
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

it is not always necessary that memory is always responsible for performance issues....Is this is converted vm and what kind of storage are u using ....what kind of performance issues r u facing

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Mike_Pownall
Contributor
Contributor

Thanks for the response Neil, that makes sence now.

As for the VM, it has 2 vCPU's and the host has 4 Quad Cores (2.4Ghz)

Thanks

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Mike_Pownall
Contributor
Contributor

Hi

The performance probs are slow responce times from an application.

The VM spec is:

  • Windows srv 2003 STD

  • 2 x vCPU

  • 4096 Mem

  • 12 Gb C: drive (Currently located on local esx storage)

  • 200Gb E: drive (currently located on local esx storage)

  • SQL 2005

We've run redgate (SQL performance monitor) on the SQL db and found no probs.

The application supplier is blaming the VM, but I don't believe that were the issue is. They are point towards memory issues.

They have adviced us to up the page file size from

4096mb to, and this is not a typo 2 x 10Gb over 2 drives.

With my minimal knowledge of Memory/Paging etc. this just seems outrageous?

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Chuck8773
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

What kind is the ESX local storage? SATA, SAS? How Many disks? What RAID type? How many other VM's are on that same LUN? Are the C and E VMDK files on the same LUN?

Charles Killmer, VCP

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Mike_Pownall
Contributor
Contributor

Hi Chuck8773,

The local storage is 2 x 450GB SAS 15k drives, mirrored.

Currently it's the only VM running on local disk. The C and the E are seperate VMDK's, located with the VM. (I moved the VM to local storage to get the SAN out of the picture)

Thanks

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Chuck8773
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

Check the performance tab in the vSphere Client. Specifically, look at the CPU Ready time, Memory Balloon, and Memory Swap.

What are the peak values over the past day? How about real time?

Charles Killmer, VCP

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