VMware Cloud Community
farri304
Contributor
Contributor

Guest OS Label/Version Wrong

I did a search on the forums on this and most of the information I got was a little dated.

So I have a few VMs with incorrect labels. Example: Windows 2008 R2 is labeled Windows 7(according to Edit Settings - Options - Version). If you look at the summary tab on the VM though the guest is labeled correctly with Win 2008 R2. VMware Tools also gives me an OK that it is installed. I always thought when the vmtools iso mounts it selects the tools version based off the Guest OS Label. So Im assuming Windows 7 VMtools is installed on this Windows 2008 R2 guest. But Im not really seeing any issues. Im running Alan Renouf's script right now to see if more are mislabeled but Im wondering how much of an issue this is since I havent seen any VMtool install failures, driver issues, or any problems at all. I would be a little more concerned if my Win 2008 R2 guest had a Windows XP label...but I havent run the script yet so who knows.

Any thoughts on this?

Thanks

Joe

Twitter: @joefarri
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4 Replies
OwenW201110141
Contributor
Contributor

Did you ever find a resolution or hear anything else about this?

I would also like to know the answer to this question.

The problem I have found is that while vmtools shows the correct version, as does running the get-vmguest cmdlet against a vm, when you select a resourcepool or folder virtual machine listing and show the "Guest OS" column, the Guest OS that is shown here is what is in Edit Settings -> Options for the vm, and not what the vmtools report back. How frustrating!

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R_Brightwell
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

I'm having the same issue as above.  Any word on a fix or a way to change the label?

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OwenW201110141
Contributor
Contributor

I havn’t seen any updates to this sorry.

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MKguy
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

There are basically 2 kinds of GuestOS indicators:

The first one is the static GuestOS you configured the VM with during creation or under edit settings -> Options. This is generally what you expect to install in the VM and what's written in the VMX-file. However, it generally does not have any significant importance anymore unless you try to install a 64bit OS into a VM set to a 32bit OS for example. This setting also affects which VMware Tools ISO (Linux vs. Windows vs. etc.) will be mounted when you select to install the VMware Tools (provided the VM has no tools running currently).

Now the 2nd indicator becomes visible once you install the VMware Tools, it's what the Tools detect they are running on. This is what's being displayed as the "Guest OS" in the general pane of the summary tab of a VM when it's powered-on with running Tools. This value is independent of GuestOS setting explained above and purely relies on the execution and detection of the VMware Tools service inside the VM, meaning you can't really control this "setting" (or rather informational value).

Mismatches between set and running OS shouldn't cause significant issues in most cases, as long as it's the same OS family. Maybe a bit more unnecessary overhead when running a 32bit OS inside a 64bit running VM for example. Also, the default monitor mode for a VM set to Windows 2003 (and probably XP) does not take advantage of CPU hardware-assisted virtualization instructions unless you explicitly set it:

http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2001372

So in summary, it's obviously best to align configured and running OS to have a clean and matching state.

-- http://alpacapowered.wordpress.com
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