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qrt1977
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Stretched Cluster or Standard Cluster

Hello All !!

I'm a little bit confused what the definition is of a stretched cluster.

Let me try to explain what I would like to do.

We have 2 Server rooms in the same building.

both Server rooms are connected with fiber and direct UTP.

If I have 4 nodes (cluster) in 1 Server Room and I would like to move 2 of these nodes to the other Server room but still like to keep it as one cluster.

Can I keep my Standard ESXi license or do I need to upgrade to a Enterprise license to get a stretched cluster?

In theories this is still the same site and physically connected with fiber or direct CAT6 cables.

In fact it would be the same as

I have one rack 42U, and the rack is full.

I place another rack next to it and add 2 extra servers.

Do I need to buy 44 Enterprise licenses or can I keep rolling with 44 Standard licenses ?

I ask this because we would like to move towards VSAN.

But at the same time I would like to split 4 servers into 2 server rooms with both 2 nodes in the same building.

Moving towards Enterprise licenses is just to expensive and not possible.

Regards,

Kurt

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TheBobkin
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Hello Kurt,

If you have <1ms network latency between 'sites' then running as a regular non-stretched vSAN cluster should be fine - though of course the less latency the better.

Enterprise vSAN licensing is required for stretched-clusters:

vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/products/vsan/vmware-vsan-65-licensing-guide.pdf

Note that these are additional licenses for vSAN on top of the ESXi licensing - not sure if you can put Enterprise vSAN license on Standard-licensed ESXi, consider asking our licensing team as that appears unclear.

Bob

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RvdNieuwendijk
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You can move two ESXi servers to the other server room using the vSphere Standard licenses you already have. If you want to use vSAN, you will need additional vSAN licenses.

Blog: https://rvdnieuwendijk.com/ | Twitter: @rvdnieuwendijk | Author of: https://www.packtpub.com/virtualization-and-cloud/learning-powercli-second-edition
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TheBobkin
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Hello Kurt,

If you have <1ms network latency between 'sites' then running as a regular non-stretched vSAN cluster should be fine - though of course the less latency the better.

Enterprise vSAN licensing is required for stretched-clusters:

vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/products/vsan/vmware-vsan-65-licensing-guide.pdf

Note that these are additional licenses for vSAN on top of the ESXi licensing - not sure if you can put Enterprise vSAN license on Standard-licensed ESXi, consider asking our licensing team as that appears unclear.

Bob

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qrt1977
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So If I setup a 4 Node VSAN cluster in 1 Datacenter ( all working 100% )

and then I move 2 nodes towards the other datacenter

AND

Connect the 4 nodes like it was before

Instead I will have 2 X 10 gbit switches ( connect the 10 Gbit switches with each other  )

then there is no need to have the enterprise license

AND

I have a look-a-like more redundant setup like Stretched Cluster.

Correct ?

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RvdNieuwendijk
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Correct. There is nothing extra in the vSphere Enterprise Plus license compared to the vSphere Standard license that you will need to set up the stretched vSAN cluster. See for a comparison between the vSphere Standard license and vSphere Enterprise Plus license: Comparing vSphere Editions: vSphere Standard and vSphere Enterprise Plus « vMiss.net .

Blog: https://rvdnieuwendijk.com/ | Twitter: @rvdnieuwendijk | Author of: https://www.packtpub.com/virtualization-and-cloud/learning-powercli-second-edition
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qrt1977
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Thank You all !!

Enterprise Plus is only needed when you have a "Stretched Cluster" between 2 different geographical locations.

For me this is not the situation, physically it is the same geographical location, just another "room"

That looks better for the budget :smileycool:

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