dorakirin
Contributor
Contributor

Using SSD HDD with VMWare Workstation

Dear all,

I am running VMs using VMWare Workstation v10 on a Crucia M4 (512 GB) SSD HD.

I use the "snapshot" function a lot and each of those "snapshot" will require at least 10 GB worth of space (mine is a pretty large VM). My work requires me to constantly create and delete such "snapshots". (i.e., adding and deleting 10 GB worth of data every time). At its peak, this "adding" and "deleting" may happen up to 4 times each per day over period of one week.

After less than half a year, the SSD HDD called it quits and went dead. I could not do anything with it including trying to format it. I got a one-for-one replacement from the local retailer, but data in it is all gone.

I would like to ask: according to my usage pattern, is SSD HDD the right way for me? (I understand the limited lifespan issue of SSD HDDs.)

Regards,

Dorakirin

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7 Replies
newbie93
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

Welcom to the forums.

I have been running the exact same model on this very machine for about 1-1/2 years. No problems running multiple (4-5) VMs on a daily basis taking multiple snapshots, but not quite doing 10GB per day.

Yes, SSDs are much less forgiving when they fail, you've now learned that backups are even more important than ever when using them. Always backup data that's important, that's always been the rule. If you are generating large amounts of data, anything other than RAID 0 might provide a first line of defense, but RAID != Backups.

RAID - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Re: failed drive. If the flash is intact, a new controller board might be able to get to the data. It depends on the failure mode. Have you talked directly with Crucial and not the local retailer about possible data recovery?

Message was edited by: Bill Johnson

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dorakirin
Contributor
Contributor

Hi there,

Thanks for the note.

I have a backup for this VM and therefore lost around a week's worth of development work (could be worse). I am more concerned about the appropriateness of using SSD HDD (specifically Crucial M4) to run VMWare Workstation along with creation of multiple snapshots of 10 GB each on daily basis.

I posted the question to Crucial but I have not received any replies yet.

(The local retailer is not interested in anything else apart from fulfilling their obligation of one-to-one exchange.)

I am trying to verify the relationship between the failure of the SSD HDD and large VM snapshots. If it is true that SSD HDDs are bad choice for my pattern of working, then I will perhaps bear with the slowness of a spinning HDD rather than taking the risk of it failing me any moment.

But on the other hand, I might have gotten a lemon M4...

What do you think?

Regards,

Dorakirin

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newbie93
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

I would say that after 1/2 year of using the M4, it's probably not a lemon unless it was subjected to damaging power supply voltages or severe mechanical stress (would have to be much higher than stresses that would damage a spinning rust HDD).

After 1/2 year it's not an infant mortality issue either.

Do you know what version firmware the original drive was using? Can you check your new drive for its firmware version?

My guess would be either your usage model exposes a problem with the drive's design life or a bug in the firmware.

Keep bugging Crucial until they give a satisfactory answer to whether or not the drive should survive your usage model, at a minimum, I am interested.

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Scissor
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

I found this link to some specs:

http://www.crucial.com/pdf/Tech_specs-letter_Crucial_m4_ssd_v9-22-11_online.pdf

If I am reading the PDF correctly the drive endurance for your 512 GB model is listed as "72TB=40GB per day for 5 years".

=-=-=

Does your Host's Operating System support sending TRIM commands to your SSD drive? (If you are running Windows 7 or later you are fine).

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dorakirin
Contributor
Contributor

Hi newbie93,

This is the reply from Crucial:

Thank you for contacting Crucial. It sounds like our high endurance SSD would be a better fit for your needs. Please visit the following link:

http://www.crucial.com/store/ProductMarketing_p400e.aspx

Not sure what is the great difference between M4 and one of those "high endurance SSD".

Regards,

Dorakirin

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dorakirin
Contributor
Contributor

By the way, I have not checked the firmware of the replacement M4 unit yet... the box is still sealed at the moment.

But if I were to continue using it, I will surely upgrade its firmware. (downloaded and ready for it).

Regards,

Dorakirin

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dorakirin
Contributor
Contributor

Hi Scissor,

Thanks for the info.

Looking at the specs, I have the same understanding. Even if I write slightly more than 40 GB per day, it should have lasted me for maybe 4 years... rather than half a year.

I am using Windows 7, and I have checked that TRIM is active.

Now I am not sure if I want to continue using the M4 for my work, or survive with a slower traditional spinning hard disk.

Smiley Sad

Regards,

Dorakirin

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