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dknapp
Contributor
Contributor

Power reset on hung Win7 client not working

Tried installing IE 10 on a Win7 Pro client in VMWare Workstation 9.0.0. build 812388, perhaps a bad idea I admit. As part of the install process, which seemed to go OK, IE 10 asked to reboot the Win 7 client. I clicked Yes. The reboot process hung with the client displaying what looks like the Win 7 "press Ctrl-Alt-Delete" screen. Howerver, the window is not fully visible and it is not responsive to the keyboard or the "send Ctrl+Alt+Del" VM option. So, I tried using the VM Power menu "Reset" option to restart the client. This also is not responding (after waiting all night), and all the other options are greyed out. It looks like I will need to reboot the whole PC. Seems to me the reset option should actually reset any client. What it seems to be doing is waiting for some response from the already hung client. Any other way to get this client to stop, short of rebooting the PC or killing VMWorkstation in task manager?

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dknapp
Contributor
Contributor

Additional info. I killed VMware in Task Manager, then tried to restart it and the client. Was unable to restart the client. I get a window saying "The virtual machine appears to be in use".  The "take ownership" button does not work. After stopping more VMware tasks, the client was no longer seen as in use. After a boot of client in safe mode, then a restart into full mode, all seems OK. Just wish that a reset would actually reset the client.

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mfelker
Expert
Expert

Just wondering if you tried a reset from within the OS itself (using the Start buttons).  Or use ctrl-alt-insert to pass ctrl-alt-delete to the guest?

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dknapp
Contributor
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I could not get it to respond from any form of Ctrl-Alt-whatever. Did try the Ctrl-alt-Insert, as I use that on other VM clients. No response with that either. I would have thought that the VM menu item would have been more effective than any other method, but it was not to be.

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mfelker
Expert
Expert

Two questions/remvarks  come to mind.

1)  If you pressed ctrol-alt-delete when you  were in the guest did the host shutdown screen appear?

More important

2)  IE 10 specifically for Winoows 8.

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MarAndreas
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

Martin Felker wrote:

2)  IE 10 specifically for Winoows 8.

IE10 Release Preview for Windows 7 was released on Tuesday...

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dknapp
Contributor
Contributor

1. I don’t remember doing that. I probably pressed ctrl-alt-insert. When in the host, ctrl-alt-del did result in the host shutdown screen

2. I had downloaded the IE10 for Windows 7 32-bit preview from http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/internet-explorer/downloads/ie-10/worldwide-languages.

In different VM I already was running Win 8 and that came already with IE10.

David Knapp

Quest Diagnostics Nichols Institute | Technical Specialist - Information Technology Services | 14225 Newbrook Dr. | Chantilly, VA 20153 USA | Phone 1.800.336.3718 | 703.802.6900 x66825 | Fax 703.802.7107 |david.w.knapp@questdiagnostics.com<mailto:%7Cdavid.w.knapp@questdiagnostics.com> | www.NicholsInstitute.com<http://www.nicholsinstitute.com/>;

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mfelker
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I found this  in a very quick Google search.   Post is dated November 13 which I believe is right around the time you started the thread.  Interesting the at the source is CBS news.!

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57549150/microsoft-releases-ie-10-browser-for-windows-7/

Sound pretty experimental to me.  Of course its up to youj whether the risk of trying IE on muliplte versions of Windows 7 is worth the cost in frustration and time.

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dknapp
Contributor
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Interesting. One of my duties is to try out, in an informal way, Windows features that are coming down the pike to be sure that existing corporate software works with them. Since we are implementing Win 7 on thousands of PCs, VM Workstation is very handy for reducing the hardware clutter around my cube. I would not be surprised to see MS make IE10 a standard feature on newer Win 7 builds if it gets good reviews.Some of our PCs are not configured by the corporate vendor, so having a PC show up with IE10 is a possibility. So far, after a couple weeks of messing around with Win 8 on a VM, I am not a fan of it without a touch screen. It is useable, but nothing that grabs me shows up. On touch screen laptops and Surface computers, it works fine but still seems to me to have limited appeal for much of what we do at a corporate level. Maybe we just need to start programming for it in a different way. However, I would much rather replace a $15 keyboard than a $150 touch screen if too much finger activity wears it out.

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mfelker
Expert
Expert

This is off-topic but I'm curious why your company would not nudge your users towards Firefox, or even Chrome?

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dknapp
Contributor
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I am not in the chain of folks here who make those decisions, so cannot say for sure. However, there is no restriction in the use of Firefox or Chrome if people want to use those browsers. I think is it just that officially supporting those other products would open the support staffers to more questions and debugging sessions, since we often don't know if the developers had written specifically for one browser. There is enough trouble with products like Java changing every few weeks and thereby breaking existing apps that we probably don't want to take on another couple of browsers that might or might not support some product we use. A few years ago there was significant differences between the various browsers, but with the advent of IE8 and 9, I don't see all that much difference between them. I cannot understand why anyone cares which free product has the most market share now days. Firefox has lots of customizations available and Chrome is, for me, the preferred browser at home, but at work IE-whatever does the job, mostly, and we don't need to worry that somebody will download a kooky add-in that will soak up the corporate bandwidth with constant weather updates or the cutest cat videos. In the corporate world I think there is more concentration on low maintenance and compatibility with existing applications than on which browser has the best incremental speed or supports the latest animation technique. In fact, most browser use here is for apps running within the corporate firewall, apps that were written years ago for ASP or Java. No one is going to take a legacy app and rewrite it in HTML 5 to take advantage of some new feature. Most of our users just don't care which browser they use so long as they can get their work done with the least amount of trouble. At least that is my best guess.

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mfelker
Expert
Expert

I was just interested out of curiosity and essentially it was it was OT.  I think your organization may be going agaigst the direction of the of development in an age of BYOD.  From what   I read in trade magazines  this is more of challenge to support than a change in browsers.  I appreciate your taking the time to provide a detailed answer - every organiztional stgructure  will vary and larger oranizations have different relations with IT in general.

I wish you and your organiztion good luck!

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