chtuc
Contributor
Contributor

Migration of a single VMware 6 license from one computer to another...

I"m now the proud owner of a single license for Workstation6.

I would very much like to test its use on an AMD and subsequently, on an INTEL computer. I've read the EULA but admit being stumped.

I can't figure out if what I am planning is allowed.

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12 Replies
nick_couchman
Immortal
Immortal

I believe it is allowed, provided you make sure you completely remove it from one PC. I'm sure moving processor architectures doesn't matter - it's either allowed or not - processor isn't going to matter. I don't think WS licenses are tied to a specific piece of hardware...

RDPetruska
Leadership
Leadership

Licenses are only different for host OS platform - Windows OR Linux. The actual PC/CPU does not matter. So as long as you are using the same host OS platform, your license will still work.

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lkuderick
Contributor
Contributor

>> So as long as you are using the same host OS platform, your license will still work. <<

I'm evaluating VMware to use it to migrate my programming enviroment from work to home and back again. I'm assuming that I can use the same license on my work machine as well as my home work station so long as they have the same OS? Is this correct? If I have to have a separate license for the two machines, I doubt if I can get my employer to cover the cost. Actually, I also think there will be times when I would be at a clients site and it would even be helpful to have the enviroment available then as well, so potentially it would/could be installed on up to 3 machines although installing it on my laptop would be unlikely.

My current plan is to install the Virtual machine on a External Hard drive, and take it with me when I travel. Is this type of use going to cause me a problem?

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nick_couchman
Immortal
Immortal

Well, the license only covers installing it on ONE machine, so I don't think you're going to be able to install it on both machines, even if you can only run it on one at a time. Maybe a VMware employee can chime in about that, but I'm pretty sure the license only covers installation on one machine at a time.

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KevinG
Immortal
Immortal

My understanding of the Workstation EULA allows you to use the license on only one PC.

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lkuderick
Contributor
Contributor

Well, that's unfortunate. I guess I'll have to see if I can get the boss to spring for two copies.

Thanks for the quick feedback. I'll have to think about this some more.

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oreeh
Immortal
Immortal

Maybe Player is sufficient on one of the hosts?

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nick_couchman
Immortal
Immortal

Is there some reason you need the full Workstation in both places? If you're going to be doing things other than Teams or modifying VM configuration at home, why not just use Player at home, instead. Player 2.0 supports a lot of the features that WS6 has, so would that be a viable solution?

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ClayMon
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

My current plan is to install the Virtual machine on

a External Hard drive, and take it with me when I

travel. Is this type of use going to cause me a

problem?

You should be eligible for one Ace license when Workstation 6 was purchased. This probably would meet your needs, and this would also allow the VM to be encrypted to help protect the development data in case your external drive gets stolen.

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lkuderick
Contributor
Contributor

Yes, I think player would be a viable option if it allows me to use the virtual system and make changes to programs and files within which from the documentation, it apparently is allowed.

With Player can I install new software into the virtual system?

Actually, other than not allowing the creation of new virtual systems, are there any other drawbacks I should be aware of?

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RDPetruska
Leadership
Leadership

Yes, I think player would be a viable option if it

allows me to use the virtual system and make changes

to programs and files within which from the

documentation, it apparently is allowed.

With Player can I install new software into the

virtual system?

Yes. Realize that the guest OS has no idea it is not running on real hardware. There is nothing happening inside the guest which would not happen oh a physical PC.

Actually, other than not allowing the creation of new

virtual systems, are there any other drawbacks I

should be aware of?

Well, you can actually use some 3rd party tools to create/edit VMs... there's just nothing built in to Player. Other limitations are: No scripting, no Teams, no multiple snapshots/snapshot manager, cannot create clones, snapshots.

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lkuderick
Contributor
Contributor

Great! That helps a lot. Sounds like Player will work fine for my needs. I appreciate the feedback. Thanks!

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