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IPv6 - when?

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By using the new Windows operating systems (Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2) I'd like to switch from the obsolete IPv4 to the new IPv6 Internet Protocol standard.

Is there a roadmap about when VMware Workstation is going to fully support IPv6?

Axel Dahmen



[VMware]: Workstation 16 Pro; --
[host]: Windows 10x64 host; --
[guests]: Windows 10x64, Windows 8x64.
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Immortal
Immortal

This is not about me and my local configuration. It's about that I'm supposed to learn IPv6 as part of my job. And I suppose Workstation to provide me with the platform to do that.

By the things you've posted in this thread, I take it you're relying on VMWare Workstation's DHCP. Well, since Workstation doesn't do IPv6 yet, you need to provide your own. Build a VM that with a IPv6 DHCP service, then disable Workstation's DHCP. That way you can still use Teams and other Workstation features and still be on a IPv6 network.

Your point is that you need to learn IPv6. Well part of that learning will just have in involve creating a IPv6 DHCP server. Smiley Wink

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Virtuoso
Virtuoso

In vsphere you can enable ipv6, perhaps in workstation 7 ipv6 wiill be supported.

MCP, VCP3 , VCP4
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Commander
Commander

What do you mean by fully support IPv6? If you network is IPv6, configure a bridged vNIC for your VMs and the VMs will be capable of communicating via IPv6 too.

Kind Regards,

Gerrit Lehr

If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

Kind regards, Gerrit Lehr If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".
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I'd like to create a team and a host-only network, respectively. But the Workstation DHCP server currently only supports IPv4.

I need to learn about how to administer the new standard.



[VMware]: Workstation 16 Pro; --
[host]: Windows 10x64 host; --
[guests]: Windows 10x64, Windows 8x64.
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Workstation uses IP addressed, given to it by host OS, so you must have an IPv6 network, than Workstation 7 will work with it. ANd for what do you need an IPv6? Why IPv4 doesn`t pass you anymore?

StarWind Software R&D

StarWind Software R&D http://www.starwindsoftware.com
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Workstation is application working in OS, and gives IPs to VMs given by host OS, so you must have an IPv6 network to work with IPv6 in your VMs.

StarWind Software R&D

StarWind Software R&D http://www.starwindsoftware.com
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Workstation is working in host, while ESX is an OS, so Workstation assigns IPs to VMs as it was given by host OS. So, you must have an IPv6 network.

StarWind Software R&D

StarWind Software R&D http://www.starwindsoftware.com
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Workstation is working in host, while ESX is an OS, so Workstation

assigns IPs to VMs as it was given by host OS. So, you must have an

IPv6 network.

StarWind Software R&D

StarWind Software R&D http://www.starwindsoftware.com
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Highlighted

Workstation is working in host, while ESX is an OS, so Workstation

assigns IPs to VMs as it was given by host OS. So, you must have an

IPv6 network.

StarWind Software R&D

StarWind Software R&D http://www.starwindsoftware.com
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Highlighted

Workstation is working in host, while ESX is an OS, so Workstation

assigns IPs to VMs as it was given by host OS. So, you must have an

IPv6 network.

StarWind Software R&D

StarWind Software R&D http://www.starwindsoftware.com
0 Kudos
Highlighted

Workstation is working in host, while ESX is an OS, so Workstation

assigns IPs to VMs as it was given by host OS. So, you must have an

IPv6 network.

StarWind Software R&D

StarWind Software R&D http://www.starwindsoftware.com
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Hot Shot
Hot Shot

Currently I'm using NAT, Host-Only and Team environments, respectively. And the Workstation DHCP server doesn't seem to support IPv6.



[VMware]: Workstation 16 Pro; --
[host]: Windows 10x64 host; --
[guests]: Windows 10x64, Windows 8x64.
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Hot Shot
Hot Shot

This forum server must have had a real serious headache... Smiley Wink

Workstation uses IP addressed, given to it by host OS

This isn't correct. In Host-only mode and in NAT mode IP addresses are provided by VMware virtual networks.

And for what do you need an IPv6? Why IPv4 doesn`t pass you anymore?

Let me refer you to Wikipedia for an appropriate anwer.



[VMware]: Workstation 16 Pro; --
[host]: Windows 10x64 host; --
[guests]: Windows 10x64, Windows 8x64.
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User Moderator
User Moderator

And for what do you need an IPv6? Why IPv4 doesn`t pass you anymore?

Let me refer you to Wikipedia for an appropriate anwer.

Why does your VMware Workstation instance sit directly on the internet? are the following Private Address spaces not enough for you?

RFC1918 name

IP address range

number of addresses

classful\ description

largest CIDR\ block (subnet mask)

host id size

24-bit block

10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255

16,777,216

single class A

10.0.0.0/8 (255.0.0.0)

24 bits

20-bit block

172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255

1,048,576

16 contiguous class Bs

172.16.0.0/12 (255.240.0.0)

20 bits

16-bit block

192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255

65,536

256 contiguous class Cs

192.168.0.0/16 (255.255.0.0)

16 bits

If you found this or any other answer useful please consider the use of the Helpful or correct buttons to award points

Tom Howarth VCP / vExpert

VMware Communities User Moderator

Blog: www.planetvm.net

Contributing author for the upcoming book "[VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment|http://my.safaribooksonline.com/9780136083214]”. Currently available on roughcuts

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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Hot Shot
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This is not about me and my local configuration. It's about that I'm supposed to learn IPv6 as part of my job. And I suppose Workstation to provide me with the platform to do that.



[VMware]: Workstation 16 Pro; --
[host]: Windows 10x64 host; --
[guests]: Windows 10x64, Windows 8x64.
0 Kudos
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Immortal
Immortal

This is not about me and my local configuration. It's about that I'm supposed to learn IPv6 as part of my job. And I suppose Workstation to provide me with the platform to do that.

By the things you've posted in this thread, I take it you're relying on VMWare Workstation's DHCP. Well, since Workstation doesn't do IPv6 yet, you need to provide your own. Build a VM that with a IPv6 DHCP service, then disable Workstation's DHCP. That way you can still use Teams and other Workstation features and still be on a IPv6 network.

Your point is that you need to learn IPv6. Well part of that learning will just have in involve creating a IPv6 DHCP server. Smiley Wink

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Contributor
Contributor

I'm new to VMware, so I don't get to reply to many posts. But this one a can't resist.

Since when is IPv4 obsolete? I'm a network engineer and the only new IPv6 I see is in labs and on home networks. Yes, some government funded projects are being started, IPv4 will be the Internet standard for many more years.

That didn't help anyone. But it felt good.

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Hot Shot
Hot Shot

Thanks, asatoran, you're perfectly right. This will help me do the trick! I'm not too ackquainted with Workstation yet and I'm often unsure about how it's working. Plus all the new information on the new MS OS features...

Since when is IPv4 obsolete? I'm a network engineer and the only new IPv6 I see is in labs and on home networks. Yes, some government funded projects are being started, IPv4 will be the Internet standard for many more years.

I've got my primary information from this Wikipedia article. It states that the IPv4 address range is at its end and no more Internet addresses may be available as of 2012.

Actually this topic came to my attention when digging into the new Microsoft operating systems (Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2). They now provide full support of IPv6 as the new primary protocol version. Microsoft has added a couple of corresponding software tunnelling adapters to still provide IPv4 services, more or less as kind of legacy service. That made me curious about what this is all about.

All these adapters can be displayed by typing into the Console:

IPCONFIG /ALL

I started searching what these tunneling adapters exist for. In the corresponding Wikipedia article I've then found the reason for all that. It states that IPv4 is at its end. There are no more addresses available. A couple of techniques are already in place to cope with that problem (NAT, CIDR) but their capabilities are limited. The class diagram Tom mentioned, for example, is not current information. It is obsolete for more than three years now. There is no more room to keep these class ranges alive. I myself wasn't aware of this fact until now.

For these reasons I personally believe it's urgent to get ackquainted with the new version.



[VMware]: Workstation 16 Pro; --
[host]: Windows 10x64 host; --
[guests]: Windows 10x64, Windows 8x64.
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Contributor
Contributor

So now up to VMP 16 and has there been any attempt to catch-up with IPv6, or is this still a lame duck hiding behind the naive belief that only suspect individuals and governments use IPv6?

 

Personally, I use IPv6 quite extensively (not least because I have thousands of IPv6 addresses at my disposal and they are free, unlike the block of IPv4 addresses which I have no choice but to use for hardware and configurations that are still in the dark ages, so to speak); so if I am to eventually buy a license for VMP 16 (as opposed to refreshing the Windows 10 host when the 30-day license period expires) I really need to know if there is any intention to take IPv6 seriously and to provide a program that will actually work with IPv6 (which it definitely does not at the moment, and not knowing whether that is because of lack of development or because the product is broken).

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VMware Employee
VMware Employee

Hi @ziw9Z7AaTGq,

Workstation Pro has supported IPv6 for several releases now, e.g.: VMware Workstation Pro 16.0 documentation: Change NAT Settings 

Are there specific problems you are encountering with IPv6 and VMware Workstation or specific features which you have found to be lacking IPv6 support?

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