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xilex
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Can I move a snapshot somewhere else and bring it back later?

I have a WinXP running inside VMware and there are three snapshots and one current running instance. I want to move the snapshots away to save on disk space, but I want to have them in the future. I see four sets of files: WinXP-x86-000001, WinXP-x86-000002, WinXP-x86-000004, WinXP-x86-s001. Depending on the timestamp on the files, I can tell which ones correlate with the snapshots, and that WinXP-x86-000002 is the current imagefile in use. There are also a number of WinXP-x86-Snapshot1/2/4 and the main WinXP-x86 file. I can't tell which is in current use. But I wanted to ask if I can move some of these files to a backup hard drive, without irreparably disrupting the current VMWare image, and then I can move them back in the future when I want to go back to some particular snapshot. Thanks.

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WoodyZ
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If you do not have adequate free disk space then consider installing a bigger hard drive or move the entire Virtual Machine to a drive that has adequate free disk space and run it from there.

That said, while technically you could have the Snapshot Disks reside on a different drive then the Base Disk you cannot separate the Snapshots Disks from the Base Disk and then, generally speaking, use the Base Disk by itself and then add the Snapshots Disks back.  In other words if you separate the disks you must then continue to use the Virtual Machine configured as it is however the value of the "parentFileNameHint" parameter in the "Disk DescriptorFile" of the first Snapshot Disk will have to be properly edited to account for the change in location.

Unless you totally understand the interdependence of all the files that comprise a Virtual Machine then be very careful about separating files from being stored together in a single location.

Also make sure that at a minimum you have any User Data that resides within the Virtual Machine backed up before doing anything.

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WoodyZ
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If you do not have adequate free disk space then consider installing a bigger hard drive or move the entire Virtual Machine to a drive that has adequate free disk space and run it from there.

That said, while technically you could have the Snapshot Disks reside on a different drive then the Base Disk you cannot separate the Snapshots Disks from the Base Disk and then, generally speaking, use the Base Disk by itself and then add the Snapshots Disks back.  In other words if you separate the disks you must then continue to use the Virtual Machine configured as it is however the value of the "parentFileNameHint" parameter in the "Disk DescriptorFile" of the first Snapshot Disk will have to be properly edited to account for the change in location.

Unless you totally understand the interdependence of all the files that comprise a Virtual Machine then be very careful about separating files from being stored together in a single location.

Also make sure that at a minimum you have any User Data that resides within the Virtual Machine backed up before doing anything.

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xilex
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Thanks for the help Woodyz. Looks like VMWare keeps close track of all the links between snapshots, thought it either A) created an isolated snapshot that is independent; or B) created a *changed* snapshot that is smaller than the original base file. But looks like it is doing (A) but still linked. I think what I will do is I originally copied the entire folder with all snapshots/images to a backup drive, and I can copy this over, and I will delete the snapshots I don't need to save space. And then if I ever need the original snapshop, I can just copy back that original folder. I will lose my current data, but that is okay as I should be able to easily back it up and the theory is if I wanted to revert to a snapshot then I am willing to lose that current data.

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