Highlighted
Contributor
Contributor

Assistance needed with understanding how I get internet on my vm with a domain controller

Jump to solution

Hello all,

I am using Windows 10 to host a Domain Controller via Windows Server

As I am using a Domain Controller I require my DNS to be able to read the name of my DC so it can ping the hostname.

However I would like to make it so I can access the internet from my host machine AND still be able to access the DNS record for my domain controller.

What is the best way of doing this? Thank you for your help.

0 Kudos
1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

I'm afraid there's a misunderstanding here.  I gave you in my previous response the link to the discussion on the same topic, just for you not planning to put local workstation on the domain.  Have you tried the method given in the discussion?

To further simply it for you, here's the procedure:

1. Make sure your local workstation has access to the internet.  (If not, stop here.)

2. Put all VMs you plan to be on CORE.local on NAT.  (If you can't use NAT, stop here.)

3. Open Virtual Network Editor and find out the subnet address for NAT, which by default is VMnet8.  The subnet address should be 192.168.x.0, with default gateway IP as 192.168.x.2.  (This x is unlikely to be 1, which doesn't matter either way.)

4. Assign the following IPs to your VMs:

192.168.x.10          -> DC/DNS     (If you want this to be 200 or 201, feel free.)

192.168.x.11/n          -> non-DC     (If you want this to be in 200-range, feel free.)

5. Set gateway on all VMs as 192.168.x.2.

6. Set DNS on all VMs as 192.168.x.10 or, if you choose, 200/201.

7. Turn off firewall on all VMs, which will use firewall on the host or in your router.

You should be able to make the DC VM work first without too much trouble.

I don't think there's any difference between VMware Workstation and VirtualBox, regarding how to build a virtual network/domain, which is what you want and you can find many online posts about.

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
8 Replies
Highlighted
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

What you have described is not very clear.

If you plan to build a VM as a DC, do you plan to have other VMs to be on this domain?  I'm not sure if you mean "one vm" or "more than one vm" below:

how I get internet on my vm with a domain controller

Another thing is that I don't understand what you mean in:

I require my DNS to be able to read the name of my DC so it can ping the hostname

What and where is this DNS?  Which host do you require to be able to ping the hostname of what?

On this one:

so I can access the internet from my host machine

Does your host have access to the internet now or before you should have completed all you want to do?  Or, are you saying that you want to build a VM as a DC for the VM's host, so that the VM's host will have access to the internet under the control of its VM guest?

You may need to describe a little more about what your "end point" looks like.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor
Contributor

Hello and thanks for getting back to me! I hope the below makes sense and gives you a better idea of my setup (these are just labs im setting up)

I have a home network which is 192.168.1.0/24

I have a Windows10 machine which is 192.168.1.2 with VMWare Workstation installed

On my VMWare Workstation I have two VMs which are both running Windows Server 2016 and the name of my domain is CORE.local so if I can ping CORE.local from both VMs so that works fine and as expected.

The VMs are as follows with hostname and ip address

EU-DC1 192.168.1.200

EU-SCCM1 192.168.1.201

My Domain Controller has the DNS Feature installed because it is needed in order for EU-SCCM1 to communicate on the domain (and indeed future desktops/servers that join the domain via the domain controller at 192.168.1.200)

I want to now introduce an Internet Connection to it and this is where I am having problems.

I want to understand how I can introduce an internet connection (through any means) without affecting the DNS pointing to my core.local

I have tried NAT and Host-only for the network adaptors

Below is some more detail to help


Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : EU-DC1

   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . : CORE.local

   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid

   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : CORE.local

Ethernet adapter Ethernet0:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Connection

   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-0C-29-19-55-B6

   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.200(Preferred)

   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0

   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.200

   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{80867129-5751-461B-ACEF-D2CE02E10416}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #3

   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0

   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

C:\Users\Administrator>ping 192.168.1.201

Pinging 192.168.1.201 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.1.201: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.201: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.201: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.201: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.201:

    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:

    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms

C:\Users\Administrator>ping 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.1.200: Destination host unreachable.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:

    Packets: Sent = 1, Received = 1, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

Control-C

^C

C:\Users\Administrator>ping 8.8.8.8

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 32 bytes of data:

Control-C

^C


Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : EU-SCCM1

   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . : CORE.local

   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid

   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : CORE.local

Ethernet adapter Ethernet0:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) 82574L Gigabit Network Connection

   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-0C-29-19-80-C1

   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.201(Preferred)

   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0

   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.200

   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{65E292A7-C265-4C76-8037-A2E9B180AAAA}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter

   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0

   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

C:\Users\Administrator.CORE>ping core.local

Pinging CORE.local [192.168.1.200] with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.1.200: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.200: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.200: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.200: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.200:

    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:

    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms

C:\Users\Administrator.CORE>nslookup core.local

DNS request timed out.

    timeout was 2 seconds.

Server:  UnKnown

Address:  192.168.1.200

Name:    core.local

Address:  192.168.1.200

C:\Users\Administrator.CORE>ping 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Control-C

^C

C:\Users\Administrator.CORE>ping 8.8.8.8

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 32 bytes of data:

Control-C

^C

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

It seems to me that you don't plan to include the Workstation's host in CORE.local domain.  If so, you can have CORE.local on a subnet as 192.168.x.n, where x != 1.  If you can accept this, please take a look at this discussion: Internet Access from VMWare Workstation on a VMNet , which is about using NAT.

A separate item you need to check is firewall on all the machines in this CORE.local domain, about which you can also find discussions in this community.  The simplest way, of course, is to disable it.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor
Contributor

I don't want to use my local workstation in the domain - Any other ways you can think of that would simply share the internet connection, Virtualbox is a free product and it can easy work but with vmware it's a nightmare?

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

I'm afraid there's a misunderstanding here.  I gave you in my previous response the link to the discussion on the same topic, just for you not planning to put local workstation on the domain.  Have you tried the method given in the discussion?

To further simply it for you, here's the procedure:

1. Make sure your local workstation has access to the internet.  (If not, stop here.)

2. Put all VMs you plan to be on CORE.local on NAT.  (If you can't use NAT, stop here.)

3. Open Virtual Network Editor and find out the subnet address for NAT, which by default is VMnet8.  The subnet address should be 192.168.x.0, with default gateway IP as 192.168.x.2.  (This x is unlikely to be 1, which doesn't matter either way.)

4. Assign the following IPs to your VMs:

192.168.x.10          -> DC/DNS     (If you want this to be 200 or 201, feel free.)

192.168.x.11/n          -> non-DC     (If you want this to be in 200-range, feel free.)

5. Set gateway on all VMs as 192.168.x.2.

6. Set DNS on all VMs as 192.168.x.10 or, if you choose, 200/201.

7. Turn off firewall on all VMs, which will use firewall on the host or in your router.

You should be able to make the DC VM work first without too much trouble.

I don't think there's any difference between VMware Workstation and VirtualBox, regarding how to build a virtual network/domain, which is what you want and you can find many online posts about.

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor
Contributor

Thank you for the help so far - This is what I plan to do

EU-DC1 192.168.2.200/24

EU-SCCM1 192.168.2.201/24

I have noticed on my VMNet8 adapter that I have been allocated 192.168.2.0/24 subnet and it has an IP of 192.168.2.1 but it has not been provided a default gateway, you mentioned it should have a gateway, can I manually assign this?

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

Gateway IP should be in/show in NAT Settings.  If it's not showing there, I'd suggest you "restore defaults", which should give you a new subnet address different from 192.168.2.1, which is fine.  I remember NAT's gateway is always defaulted to 192.168.x.2.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor
Contributor

Thank you very much for your assistance, I have it working now!

0 Kudos