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How to install vmware with the vmx file?

Hi,  I have got the files which I was told that will help in vmware installation, listed as follows. 1. VM_DW1.VMX 2. VM_DW1.nvram 3. VM_DW1.vmdk 4. VM_DW1.vmsd 5. VM_DW1.vmxf  I am unable to open these files as it asks for the application with which it should be opened. I am novice in this and not sure how to install it. Do I need any software to open this file and install it? Please advise.  Regards, Velan Chandrasekar

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Immortal
Immortal

Hi Velan,

Looking at the files it seems they are workstation virtual machine files.

You can use VMware Workstation or VMware Player (Free) to open these files.

http://downloads.vmware.com/d/info/desktop_end_user_computing/vmware_player/4_0

Anand

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Hi Anand,

Thanks a lot !! This helped me and I have the VMware up and running now.

Also, I've come to know the existence & diff. between the VM files & VMware player/workstation (to some extent, atleast :-)).


Regards,

Velan Chandrasekar

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Immortal
Immortal

You're welcome Smiley Happy

Anand

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Hi,

I wonder, How to differentiate Workstation virtual machine files compared to ESX(i) VM files?

Thanks in advance.

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The answer to the first question was already given -- use a VMware hosted or native hypervisor and when you "Open" a VM, you'll browse to the .vmx file and open it.

Once you do open it and power on the VM, you should immediately install VM Tools.  VM Tools is nearly 95 or better percent drivers that will optimize your desktop or server experience, especially if it was made with a converter tool.

If you choose to install VM Tools, I recommend using the "Complete" instead of the "Typical" option -- since this will enable you to open the VM from Workstation, Player and even an ESX or ESXi environment.

I recently used the standlone converter on Windows XP to convert a PC that I want to replace with new PC running Windows 7.   Prior to wiping the drives, I created the VM clone to a USB drive, moved the drive to a Windows 7 laptop with Workstation (7.1, v8 is now available and recommended), and chose to install the VM tools.   While the tools didn't open right away, after powering on the VM, I navigated to the attached CDROM (E: drive in my case) labeled VMware Tools and ran the setup.exe file using Run As Administrator.   That's when you get to choose the type of install.

Since I was preserving this VM in case I ever needed to run the Windows XP versions of licensed software I installed there over five years, I plan to mothball or archive the VM to an eSATA drive I use for archived VMs after VM Tools was installed.   By using the Complete version, I know I can always start this up with even a test version of vSphere v4.1 Update 2 which I can run for 60 days which will be more than enough time to due whatever project I needed.

So, that's a way to 'startup up a VM from a VMX file, and also a way to ensure you can use that VM on the widest range of VMware products.

Good luck.

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Hi All.

Its my Just advice for wondered by nava_thulasi39.

You should take care for VM version, I understand.

But don't worry so much.

You can look at bellow about interoperability of Converter.

http://www.vmware.com/support/converter/doc/conv_sa_50_rel_notes.html#interop

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Hi,

My query is very simple for below answer

Hi Velan,

Looking at the files it seems they are workstation virtual machine files.

You can use VMware Workstation or VMware Player (Free) to open these files.

So is there any parameters to identify the Workstation VM?

If u answered for the same query, tell me which is the parameter?

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Hi ALL.

As nava_thulasi39 wondered, I'm classifying there files indicate created for ESX(i), too.

VM files at ESX(i) are explained bellow:

  http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1002511

and, "VM version"(I wrote) is defined paragraph of: ddb.virtualHWVersion = "4".

(There is one of sample!)

As nava_thulasi39 queried ESX(i) about: "VM files are imported for Workstation!?",

take care about difference ESX(i) and Workstaion.

There is guided bellow:

   http://kb.vmware.com/kb/900

Again, before use Converter, should check supported or NOT.

Regards,  Ryoji

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Hi Ryoji,

Thanks for the reply.

I am running VMs in both VMware Workstation 7.1.2 & ESX(i) 4.1 Servers.

Might be I misunderstand about your clarification because both the machines have the same VirtualHW version, it's "7"

And the links you provided, surely it's not hitting the page as you mentioned.

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I have studied the benefits of virtualization:

Now I begin to virtualize servers and high availability have:

What products do I need to VmWare Need?

I guess VMWare is installed first and then I think that virtual machines and operating systems on it.

thanks

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