yxcvyxcv
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How to get a list of all supported virtual hardware versions via powerCLI?

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Hey All,

is there a way to get a list of all supported/available (or only the latest) virtual hardware version via powercli?

enviroment: vSphere 6.7U3

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LucD
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Afaik that is not available programmatically, only through the VMware provided tables as for example in KB2007240


Blog: lucd.info  Twitter: @LucD22  Co-author PowerCLI Reference

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LucD
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Afaik that is not available programmatically, only through the VMware provided tables as for example in KB2007240


Blog: lucd.info  Twitter: @LucD22  Co-author PowerCLI Reference

yxcvyxcv
Contributor
Contributor

thanks LucD

😞 not nice.

I tried something like the way to get all available guestOS ID's [VMware.Vim.VirtualMachineGuestOSIdentifier].GetEnumValues() but no luck.....

The problem is that the CMD New-VM without the HardwareVersion option creates the vm with hardwareversion vmx-14 not vmx-15. But the CMD Doc's say "...By default, the new virtual machine is created with the highest available version..."

So i had the idea to first get the current hardwareversion and do a "autofill" for that parameter.... But how does the CMD New-VM get's the current HardwareVersion?

I'm using PowershellCore 6.2.3 and VMwareCLI-11.5.0-14912921

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LucD
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Vmx-15 only adds the ability to configure a VM with 256 vCPU instead of 128 vCPU in vmx-14.
And yes, the default HW version for new VMs (in vSphere 6.7 Update 2 and higher) is still vmx-14.

That is a 'known feature' I'm afraid.

You can easily change the default HW version on the datacenter or cluster.
But remember, vmx-15 is only available since vSphere 6.7 Update 2.

$spec = New-Object VMware.Vim.DatacenterConfigSpec

$spec.DefaultHardwareVersionKey = 'vmx-15'

$modify = $true


$dc = Get-Datacenter -Name MyDC

$dc.ExtensionData.ReconfigureDatacenter_Task($spec, $modify)


Blog: lucd.info  Twitter: @LucD22  Co-author PowerCLI Reference

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LucFullenwarth
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Enthusiast

Thanks to the information provided by LucD I could write a piece of code which does the job.

function Get-VMHostVHardwareCapability {


    param(

        [Parameter(

            Mandatory,

            ValueFromPipeline

        )]

        [VMware.VimAutomation.ViCore.Impl.V1.Inventory.InventoryItemImpl]$VMHost

    )


    process {

        foreach ($VMHostItem in $VMHost) {

            [PSCustomObject]@{

                Name = $VMHostItem.Name

                VHardwareCapability = switch ([int]$VMHostItem.ExtensionData.Config.Product.Build) {

                    #Release numbers can be found here: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2143832

                    #Hardware versions can be found here: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2007240


                    #ESXi 7.0

                    { $PSItem -ge 15843807 } { 'vmx-17' }


                    #ESXi 6.7 U2

                    { $PSItem -ge 13006603 -and $PSItem -lt 15843807 } { 'vmx-15' }


                    #ESXi 6.7

                    { $PSItem -ge 8169922 -and $PSItem -lt 13006603 } { 'vmx-14' }


                    #ESXi 6.5

                    { $PSItem -ge 4564106 -and $PSItem -lt 8169922 } { 'vmx-13' }


                    #ESXi 6.0

                    { $PSItem -ge 2494585 -and $PSItem -lt 4564106 } { 'vmx-11' }


                    #ESXi 5.5

                    { $PSItem -ge 1331820 -and $PSItem -lt 2494585 } { 'vmx-10' }


                    #ESXi 5.1

                    { $PSItem -ge 799733 -and $PSItem -lt 1331820 } { 'vmx-9' }


                    #ESXi 5.0

                    { $PSItem -ge 469512 -and $PSItem -lt 799733 } { 'vmx-8' }


                    #ESXi/ESX 4.x

                    { $PSItem -ge 164009 -and $PSItem -lt 469512 } { 'vmx-7' }

                    Default { 'Unknow ESXi version' }

                }

            }

        }

    }

}


Get-VMHost | Get-VMHostVHardwareCapability

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David_A_Stewart
Contributor
Contributor

Great idea, but the problem with this approach, is that some of the version numbers overlap.

For example ESXi 7.0 GA (15843807) is lower than ESXI 6.7 EP18 (17499825)

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_BT_Black_V
Contributor
Contributor

I realise this is an older post

here is a code snipit to grab the hardware available hardware versions

 

$VIServer = 'VIServer-Name'
Connect-VIServer -Server $VIServer

$VMWareCluster = Get-Cluster -Name 'ClusterName'
$VMWareVersions = (Get-View $VMWareCluster.ExtensionData.EnvironmentBrowser).QueryConfigOptionDescriptor()

$Results = foreach ($SingleVersion in $VMWareVersions)
{
    $HostsDetail = foreach ($SingleHost in $SingleVersion.host)
    {
        Get-VMHost -Id "$($SingleHost.type)-$($SingleHost.value)"
    }
    [pscustomobject]@{
        Version = $SingleVersion.key
        Name    = $SingleVersion.Description
        Create  = $SingleVersion.CreateSupported
        Run     = $SingleVersion.RunSupported
        Hosts   = $HostsDetail.Name
    }
}
$Results | Format-Table -AutoSize

Hope that helps someone that comes looking later on

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LucD
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Nice find, I didn't know about that method.

As an addition, and more in line with the table in KB2007240, the following lists for all your ESXi nodes (including the standalone ones), the Name, Version, and default HW version.
And also which version you can Create, Edit, or Run on that specific ESXi node.

Get-View -ViewType ComputeResource -PipelineVariable cResource |
ForEach-Object -Process {
  if ($cResource -is [VMware.Vim.ClusterComputeResource]) {
    $envBrowser = Get-View -Id $cResource.EnvironmentBrowser
    $esx = Get-View -Id $cResource.Host
    $cluster = $cResource
  } else {
    $envBrowser = Get-View -Id $cResource.EnvironmentBrowser
    $esx = Get-View -Id $cResource.Host
    $cluster = ''
  }
  $esx | ForEach-Object -Process {
    $versions = $envBrowser.QueryConfigOptionDescriptor()
    [PSCustomObject]@{
      VMHost = $_.Name
      Cluster = $cluster.Name
      Version = $_.Config.Product.FullName
      DefaultHWVersion = ($versions.Where{ $_.DefaultConfigOption }).Key -join '|'
      Create = ($versions.Where{ $_.CreateSupported }).Key -join '|'
      Run = ($versions.Where{ $_.RunSupported }).Key -join '|'
      Edit = ($versions.Where{ $_.UpgradeSupported }).Key -join '|'
    }
  }
}

 


Blog: lucd.info  Twitter: @LucD22  Co-author PowerCLI Reference