Shamyy
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

connectivity between two clusters not on same VDS

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Hello community,

please need your kind support in this concern :

if i have two clusters one for compute and one for control and each cluster have his own distributed switch ( compute VDS and control VDS)  ,

should i can reach the vteps of control cluster from compute cluster when run this command

compute $ ping ++netstack=vxlan 192.168.4.19 -s 1492 -d

where 192.168.4.19 is the vtep of control cluster .

and the vms on two clusters should communicate normally ?

Thanks,

shmay

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lhoffer
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

Yes, you can span multiple VDS instances with a single logical switch and should be able to ping all VTEPs.  This is described in the transport zone section on page 24 of the VMware® NSX for vSphere Network Virtualization Design Guide ver 3.0

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lhoffer
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

Yes, you can span multiple VDS instances with a single logical switch and should be able to ping all VTEPs.  This is described in the transport zone section on page 24 of the VMware® NSX for vSphere Network Virtualization Design Guide ver 3.0

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Shamyy
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

so why i need to separate compute and control clusters to two separate VDS ?

or why it is recommended to separate two clusters in Two VDS ?

Thanks,

Shamy

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lhoffer
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

You don't explicitly have to, although it's pretty common to see management clusters where the NSX Manager and Controllers may reside that are part of a separate vCenter than the compute clusters.  Using a separate VDS for that also provides more flexibility to separate administrative domains and provide additional scale in environments where that's needed.  On the other hand, in a small deployment with a collapsed cluster, there's nothing necessarily wrong with using a single VDS for everything.

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Shamyy
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

thanks ihoffer so much , but how can i determine if my environment is small deployment or large ?

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lhoffer
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

In general, an environment with 10 hosts or less is considered "small" in this context, but I'd also encourage you to read the "Cluster Configurations & Sizing" section starting on page 143 of the previously mentioned design guide as it has a few pages worth of info around items that may affect the standard guidance.

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Shamyy
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Thanks alot ihoffer ,

when we create a bridge to connect with a physical server on Which VDS should i create the distributed port group that will be used in bridging , on compute VDS or on control VDS ?

Thanks,

Shamy

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iforbes
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

One thing I came across is if you decide to use a single vDS across compute and management clusters, you better ensure that all of the physical uplinks in that vDS carry the vxlan (vtep) vlan. You cannot specifically override which physical uplinks get vxlan. VXLAN will arbitrarily use any physical uplink on the vDS. So, if for example you have dedicated uplinks for hypervisor management, iscsi connectivity, vMotion, you need to ensure the vxlan vlan exists on those uplinks.

That's easy enough with vlan trunking (802.1q), but if you want physical separation then use a second vDS with 2 (or more) uplinks dedicated to vxlan (vtep).

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lhoffer
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

Main concern there is that you ensure that the VDS you're creating the port group on exists on the host where the DLR control VM for your bridge instance will live (since that hosts kernel will actually be where the bridge happens).  If both VDSs are available on said host, then compute is probably the right choice assuming that you don't want your physical server in your management VLAN (from an NSX perspective though, it doesn't really matter).

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