crunchingnumber
Contributor
Contributor

Vista Sleep

If I put my vista bootcamp vm to sleep (hybrid or otherwise), I am unable to restart the VM, because in Vista it will only wake on pressing the power on/off. Doing this on a macbook pro just causes the mac to ask whether or not you want to shut it down.

I've tried to use the powercfg command in windows to determine what devices are enabled for sleep eg keyboard usb etc, but it doesn't work. I've also re searched all other possible settings in device manager and the control panel - no joy.

Starting and shutting down the VM is a pain as it takes so long to start up, so it would be nice to be able to put the vista vm to sleep and then the mac to sleep allowing a fast startup of both.

Is there any work around for the power button on to wake the vm, or with a bootcamp vm are we just going to have to continue shutting down the vm completely and restarting vista every time we want to use it.

0 Kudos
2 Replies
jim_gill
Expert
Expert

I don't think there's a good workaround for sleep. Have you tried hibernating Vista? I do this with my Vista PC at home. While not fast, it's significantly faster than a full restart.

crunchingnumber
Contributor
Contributor

Jim:

Thanks for that. I have been trying to avoid hibernating, as Windows allocates a huge amount of disk space for hibernating (2.9gb in my case).

For the last couple of days, I have simply locked my Vista Session under windows and then simply closed the lid or sent my macbook pro to sleep. This leaves my VM suspended or locked and when i restart the mac (by restart I mean simply open the lid to re-awaken leopard), my Vista BC VM is there instantly for me just to log back in.

It's been working flawlessly for me over the last couple of days even when left overnight (not that the amount of time should matter). This obviates the need for me to put my Vista VM to sleep or to hibernate. Now I'll admit that the state of my VM may be more vulnerable as I am not sure exactly what state Windows is in should the battery fail or what ever, but if i leave no applications running, then it's relatively clean and as Fusion doesn't dirty the windows system a la parallels, recovery from such an event should be satisfactory.

I don't know what VMware thinks, but if it's a useful solution or already widely practiced by other Fusion users, I would consider promoting it Smiley Happy.

0 Kudos