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cjwprostar
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Problem with sharing permissions

I'm currently running a Windows XP Pro SP2 x64 virtual machine in my Mac OS X 10.5.5 with VMware Fusion v2. I currently have a hard drive attached to my mac that I used to use in a Windows box. It is NTFS and shared (read/write) through VMware shared folders. While in the Windows vm, I can see/open/copy files from that hard drive, but I can't write to it (save/create/delete). I've looked through some threads on the forum but can't find an answer for my problem. Anyone know how I might fix this problem? Let me know if you need more info.

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WoodyZ
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Well then your choices are to use NTFS-3G or similar to enable OS X to have write access to the NTFS Volume or you could use "/Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/vmware-rawdiskCreator" to create a Raw Disk mapping to a Virtual Hard Drive that you could add to the target Virtual Machine and then it would be available to Read & Write directly to the Physical Hard Drive while running the target Virtual Machine.

If you want Read & Write from OS X and have it as a Shared Folder then you could then boot the target Virtual Machine with a GParted ISO Image and convent the NTFS Volume to FAT32 and then remove the target Virtual Hard Drive from the target Virtual Machine and then just share it and you have simultaneous Read & Write access from both OS X and the Virtual Machine.

There are other options/scenarios however you can think about whats been presented and go from there.

Note: It should go without saying that a Full User Data Backup should be made of the target Physical Drive before connecting as a Raw Disk or converting NTFS to FAT32.

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admin
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By default, OS X can only read NTFS, not write to it. Since HGFS shared folders go through the host, you're still subject to this limitation. Any reason you don't connect the drive directly to the virtual machine?

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WoodyZ
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If this is a USB Drive then just connect it directly to the Virtual Machine or if this is a FireWire Drive then you could install NTFS-3G to provide Write Access to the NTFS Volume through OS X.

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cjwprostar
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Unfotunately, it is attached via IDE since it is an older drive that used to be in my PC. I know I could buy an IDE-USB but I would rather not spend the money. Is there any way around this?

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WoodyZ
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What type of Mac do you have and exactly how do you have this drive connected?

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cjwprostar
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It's a Mac Pro and I have the drive hooked up through the 2nd slot in the CD-ROM bay.

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WoodyZ
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Well then your choices are to use NTFS-3G or similar to enable OS X to have write access to the NTFS Volume or you could use "/Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/vmware-rawdiskCreator" to create a Raw Disk mapping to a Virtual Hard Drive that you could add to the target Virtual Machine and then it would be available to Read & Write directly to the Physical Hard Drive while running the target Virtual Machine.

If you want Read & Write from OS X and have it as a Shared Folder then you could then boot the target Virtual Machine with a GParted ISO Image and convent the NTFS Volume to FAT32 and then remove the target Virtual Hard Drive from the target Virtual Machine and then just share it and you have simultaneous Read & Write access from both OS X and the Virtual Machine.

There are other options/scenarios however you can think about whats been presented and go from there.

Note: It should go without saying that a Full User Data Backup should be made of the target Physical Drive before connecting as a Raw Disk or converting NTFS to FAT32.

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Raas
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Are you then telling us that VMWare isn't telling the truth when they say you can share files between MAC and Windows seamlessly? Read only isn't sharing completely! In order to share, I need to be able to create files on Windows and save them on MAC, through the virtual network that is automatically set up. If I can't do that, what good is Fusion? I can do it through Parallels, no problem. Also, even though advertised, Fusion won't recognize my second monitor properly. Is Fusion just sending out "market hype"?

If I want to save a document created on Windows to my shared MAC files, then I shouldn't have to load a third-party program no one has ever heard of!

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Raas
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Sorry, I got sidetracked by another phone call. I was going to tell the original poster that the way I get "around" this problem is by creating my folders in Finder, then dragging them to the "Shared" area on the left, and dropping them. Then I can drag and drop any Windows file onto that folder. I can save directly from an Office Suite created document in Windows, as long as I save to the folder that is in the "Shared" area of the finder. No, the finder doesn't have to be open, but your "Shared" area list will, or can, get lengthy.

Hope that helps a little more.

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WoodyZ
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Are you then telling us that VMWare isn't telling the truth when they say you can share files between MAC and Windows seamlessly? Read only isn't sharing completely! In order to share, I need to be able to create files on Windows and save them on MAC, through the virtual network that is automatically set up. If I can't do that, what good is Fusion? I can do it through Parallels, no problem. Also, even though advertised, Fusion won't recognize my second monitor properly. Is Fusion just sending out "market hype"?

If I want to save a document created on Windows to my shared MAC files, then I shouldn't have to load a third-party program no one has ever heard of!

First of all I'm not telling you anything because my conversation in this discussion thread isn't addressed to you and you just jumped into this thread and spouted off a bunch of nonsense seemingly without any knowledge or understanding of cjwprostar's issue. This issue is with an NTFS Formated Physical Hard Drive that has been added to the Mac that came out of a PC and OS X does not natively support writing directly to NTFS Volume and because of the the VMware Shared Folder even being set to Read & Write it is not capable of writing without adding NTFS Write Support using NTFS-3G or similar utility. Which by the way is not some obscure third-party program no one has ever heard of. You may not of head of it but that's not saying much since you felt the need to jump into this thread and rant like a lunatic.

VMware Fusion functions as advertised however the biggest problem is users like you don't bother to read the documentation and then wonder why something doesn't work as advertised.

NTFS-3G is mentioned in the documentation and while in the documentation it's in different context to what the OP's issue is nonetheless it is applicable as one of the possible solutions to the specific issue of this discussion thread you jumped into... VMware Fusion (menu bar) > Help > VMware Fusion Help > Virtual Machines > Using VMDKMounter to Mount a Virtual Disk as a Mac Volume

As far as your second monitor issue why don't you go start your own discussion thread on it.

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Raas
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Too bad, Woody got his feelings hurt. Sorry. didn't mean to step on your toes, but remember that you too have made some very bad assumptions: 1) I read my documentation. 2) I have been working with VMWare on the problem for several months now, and I am repeating only what THEY tell me. 3) as to being a lunitic, perhaps you need to read your own rants and ravings. 4) I teach computer science at Arkansas, and Fusion is one of the software products we use, hence the input directly from VMWare. 5) I know about your listed software, but that doesn't change the fact that anyone new would have absolutely no knowledge of it, and that qualifies it as obscure to the normal user. Just because you can find a reference to it in some VMWare papers doesn't change the fact that not everyone can find it and know about it. You didn't indicate that link in your previous responses either.

Lastly: I won't respond to any more of your snits, just because you took it all wrong. As to the monitor issue, it was just a passing comment, but you obviously have a temper control and attitude problem and feel the need to lash out.

I'm gone, and now remember why I very seldom come on this forum, but go directly to tech support through the University.

Thanks for reminding me! I really do appreciate it a lot! You're a great man Woody! Love you!

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WoodyZ
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First of all I didn't get my feelings hurt nor did you step on my toes and for the record I didn't call you a lunatic. Just because I said "since you felt the need to jump into this thread and rant like a lunatic" doesn't mean I was calling you one and for the record I wasn't. When taken in the overall context of what I said it was a way of contrasting exactly what you said and how off the wall and having nothing whatsoever to do with the OP's explicit and specific issue of dealing with an NTFS Formated Drive that came from a PC and the fact that Apple doesn't provide native write support for NTFS. Nor does VMware provide it directly and even if they chose to I would hope it would be disabled by default as that is something the user should decide to turn on after they know the pros and cons. VMware even prompts separately to install MacFUSE if it isn't already installed on the system as well they should. As far as I'm concerned not only did your rant not have any place whatsoever in this discussion thread it might only server to confuse the OP or anyone else looking at this with an NTFS Write Access issue in this context and that is the main reason I responded to your rant as I did.

I can't always take the time to provide an in depth explanation complete with links for every issue I help someone with and if the OP or anyone reading this thread doesn't know what NTFS-3G or anything else is for that matter then they certainly can ask or better yet just type it in a search engine and learn a little on their own. I have to admit that I find it hard to believe since you say you teach computer science that you'd jump into a thread and rant off as you did and when it comes down to it what you had to say added no value or solution to the explicit and specific issue and only serves to confuse the real issue. I'm quite sure like all teaches do you too forget to fully explain everything you put out to your students and you expect them to make use of the technology in front of them to fill in some of the gaps and it also serves to give them an opportunity to come back with additional questions after doing the research.

As far as obscure things go there isn't that much that's obscure when you can go to the Internet and type in a search engine and find the answer or at the least find a good place to ask questions for the answers you can't find.

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cjwprostar
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Thanks for the reply. I'll try out the raw disk creator first and if I can't get that working I'll try out NTFS-3G. Thanks for all your help. Smiley Happy

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WoodyZ
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I'll try out the raw disk creator first and if I can't get that working I'll try out NTFS-3G.

You can have a look at my reply in the following thread to help with "/Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/vmware-rawdiskCreator".

Thanks for all your help. Smiley Happy

Your welcome! Smiley Happy

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