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FrankMe
Contributor
Contributor

Fusion Error code VMDB -14 Pipe connection has been broken

Hello,
If I open VM ware Fusion 12.2.4 ther is an error code.
Transportfehler (VMDB) -14: Pipe connection has been broken
Does anybody know what to do?
Thank you!
MAC OS 12.6

Best regards,
Frank

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46 Replies
Technogeezer
Immortal
Immortal

Please attach a copy of the vmware.log file that’s found in the virtual machine’s bundle. You can find it by

  • Right click on the virtual machine name in the Virtual Machine Library, and select “Show in Finder”
  • A Finder window opens for the folder containing the VM. Right click on the VM and select “Show Package Contents”.
  • A new Finder window will open and show the files that make up your VM  The vmware.log file can be found there. Do not touch any of the other files found in this folder as you could damage your VM. 
- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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HKrock
Contributor
Contributor

Same Problem here...
Fusion Player 13, macOS Ventura

After a systemcrash my VM had this "Broken Pipe" Error -14.
i tried different things - a i realized that every VM has this Problem.

so it's not an VM issue as the complete VMware (Host) installation seems to be corrupt.

-> re-downloading and re-installing VMware Fusion Solved this Problem for me.

sorry for my bad english.

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Technogeezer
Immortal
Immortal

If you are still experiencing this, please attach a copy of the vmware.log file found in the VM's bundle directory of one of the virtual machines. Perhaps we can find out why it's happening in your case.

- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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jegodnit
Contributor
Contributor

I am also having the same problem.
Application: Fusion Player 13
Operating system: macOS Ventura

Every time I try to start any virtual machine to install or open the existing one, this error happens. I will forward the "vmware.log" file.

PS: I've tried other procedures but without success.

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Technogeezer
Immortal
Immortal

Your log shows you're running Ventura on a MacBook Pro Early 2013. That Mac is not supported by Apple to run Ventura , so you're probably using OCLP to get it to run. Sorry, but neither Apple nor VMware will support you running on that combination of hardware and macOS. 

If you search the forum, you will find that Apple looks to have made a change in 13.3 that's the cause of this. Reportedly that's due to OCLP needing to disable a macOS security feature in order to gain Metal acceleration with their hacked drivers in 13.3. Unfortunately you're going to have to take this up with the OpenCore community and developers. Neither Apple nor VMware will "fix" anything that is considered "broken" on unsupported configurations.  You may have to wait until and if the OCLP developers can figure out a way to re-enable that feature. Or you're going to have to drop back to macOS 13.2.1.

Or run a supported macOS version on that hardware (Big Sur), and a Fusion version that is supported on it (12.1.2).

You're not getting much more help here. It's considered bad etiquette to discuss things which clearly break vendor EULAs (in this case, Apple's) here on this forum. VMware could get into legal trouble by discussions of breaking of EULAs in a forum they sponsor.

- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
dempson
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

@Technogeezer wrote:

Your log shows you're running Ventura on a MacBook Pro Early 2013. That Mac is not supported by Apple to run Ventura , so you're probably using OCLP to get it to run. Sorry, but neither Apple nor VMware will support you running on that combination of hardware and macOS. 

[...]

Or run a supported macOS version on that hardware (Big Sur), and a Fusion version that is supported on it (12.1.2).

Minor correction: the Early 2013 MacBook Pro is officially supported up to macOS Catalina, so it already past the point of getting security updates without using OCLP to run a later macOS.

If @jegodnit needs to run VMware Fusion on a Mac, and need Intel-based guest operating systems, I'd recommend replacing that Early 2013 MacBook Pro with a later Intel model which is still supported.

Late 2013 and Early 2014 MacBook Pros were officially supported up to Big Sur; Early/Mid 2015 and 2016 MacBook Pros were officially supported up to Monterey, a 2017 MacBook Pro is the oldest officially supported by Ventura.

Apple will be announcing macOS 14 and its list of supported models at WWDC on the morning of Monday 5 June (US time). It is likely that it will drop support for 2017 models, possibly also some 2018 models. If you can't wait until the announcement, getting a 2019 or 2020 model would be a safer bet for an extra year or two of official support.

Keep in mind that the end of all macOS support for Intel Macs is approaching - I'm estimating three more macOS versions plus two years of security updates for the final Intel Mac models. We may have a clearer picture after the WWDC keynote.

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Technogeezer
Immortal
Immortal

@dempson thanks for the correction. 

- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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SvenGus
Expert
Expert

In the PPC-Intel transition, there were only 2 “hybrid” Mac OS X versions: Tiger and Leopard; while Snow Leopard was Intel-only but with Rosetta, and Lion and later totally Intel. Today, we have already had 3 Universal (Intel + Apple Silicon) versions: Big Sur, Monterey and Ventura. In theory, if Apple delivers the new Mac Pro this spring, they could ditch Intel support as early as macOS 14 (Sonoma/Sequoia/Mammoth/Redwood/whatever) while maintaining Rosetta 2, and pure Apple Silicon-only with macOS 15 and later. Probably, as you said, things will be more gradual, but the transition could also accelerate suddenly, once all hardware is based on Mx. Well, we’ll just have to wait for WWDC 2023 and see…

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dempson
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

I agree that in theory macOS 14 could drop support for all Intel Macs, but based on recent and past patterns I think that is way too soon.

Looking at the measure of "time after a model was discontinued that it is supported by the latest macOS" (public releases only, not counting betas):

1. During the PowerPC to Intel transition, the minimum for mainstream models was three years for the Late 2005 PowerMac G5, discontinued August 2006 and unable to run Snow Leopard in August 2009. The 2005 Xserve G5 was worse but was rare enough not to matter.

2. From macOS 10.12 Sierra to macOS 12 Monterey the minimum was at least five years with one exception: the Mid 2012 13-inch MacBook Pro got four years, but it was sold for longer than most models.

3. macOS 13 Ventura's minimum was slightly less than three years for one model (Late 2013 Mac Pro), just over three years for another (2017 MacBook Air), the rest were at least four years.

If we assume Apple's minimum for Macs is about three years after the model was discontinued (dipping slightly under three years for long lived models) then the Late 2019 Mac Pro should get at least three more versions (macOS 14, 15 and 16) but there is the question of which other Intel Macs come along for the ride. I'll refrain from going into a lot of detail, but for macOS 14 and a three year minimum, this includes some 2017 models (low end iMac, iMac Pro).

If macOS 14 dropped all Intel Macs then its minimum for this measure would be less than six months. We have seen that in other Apple product lines (e.g. iPod Touch) but never for Macs since the introduction of Mac OS X.

Why three years? It happens to match AppleCare coverage for Macs, and adding two years of security updates we get five years, which matches the minimum hardware servicing period from when a model was discontinued.

Rosetta 2 is a harder question: assuming no licensing constraints, it is probably a year-by-year decision when to drop it based on the installed base of "important enough" Intel applications still being used on Apple Silicon Macs. It should be there at least up to the last macOS version which supports Intel Macs. After that come the extra incentives of reducing the OS footprint and Apple's development and testing burden by being able to eliminate all the Intel code in the OS if Rosetta 2 is removed.

Waiting for WWDC to get a clearer picture.

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ColoradoMarmot
Champion
Champion

My guess is that it's 2025-2027 for dropping intel support based on their current support approach, and I expect we'll get a year's notice like we did on the kext depreciation.  

I'd guess that Rosetta 2 will last at least a few years after we lose intel support in the OS itself, so figure 2027-2030 for that.

If we're lucky we might see 'extended support' for the last Intel version, but Apple's been pretty harsh about that, so I wouldn't count on it.  In any case, if my timeline is right, that means that as early as 2026 and no later than 2028 every intel machine will be unsupported, and unpatched.  At that point, wiping them and installing Linux will be the only real option to stay secure.  Note that Windows 10 won't be supported after 2025, so that's not an option.

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Technogeezer
Immortal
Immortal

The 2025-2027 time frame for dropping Intel support for macOS might be in the ballpark. By 2026 all Intel Macs but the Mac Pro will be classified as Vintage hardware. Apple doesn’t seem to want to support a new OS version on Vintage hardware.

The Mac Pro which still remains on Intel chips may skew that date out though. Apple did drop support for the 2014 Mac Mini in Ventura, and that hardware isn’t officially Vintage yet. 

- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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dempson
Hot Shot
Hot Shot


@Technogeezer wrote:

The 2025-2027 time frame for dropping Intel support for macOS might be in the ballpark. By 2026 all Intel Macs but the Mac Pro will be classified as Vintage hardware. Apple doesn’t seem to want to support a new OS version on Vintage hardware.

Apart from the 2019 Mac Pro, there were several Intel models discontinued during 2021, all of which would be vintage by late 2026. A few will go vintage in 2027 or 2028:

  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2020): discontinued March 2022, vintage about March 2027.
  • Mac mini (2018): discontinued January 2023, vintage about January 2028.
  • Mac Pro (2019): probably discontinued in the next month or two, vintage about mid 2028.

That Mac mini needs to be supported at least by macOS 14 and macOS 15; if it was dropped by macOS 16 (late 2025) then it would be a few months short for security updates. If this model was the only consideration, Apple could extend macOS 15 security updates a few months longer than usual.

Would that suffice for the 2019 Mac Pro? It would need about nine extra months of security updates, which feels more like it should get one more macOS version. Other models might come along for the ride, depending on driver support and CPU/GPU requirements.

[Edited then back again to correct off-by-one miscalculation.]

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ColoradoMarmot
Champion
Champion

Apple dropped everything at 5 years for Ventura, so that's as long as I would count on being able to run things with full patch support.  If you're right and the Mac Pro drops off at WWDC, then 2028's WWDC is the furthest out for the of the line - question is, will they drop intel from the OS and as you suggest, just extend security patches for that last intel version for a couple of years.  Wouldn't surprise me to see that happen with the OS release in 26 or 27, and an Mx only release at that point.  I think 26-28 is a fair guess for when folks will be forced to update intel hardware.  Remind me to buy stock that next year 🙂

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Technogeezer
Immortal
Immortal

@dempson Good call as I totally had a brain cramp about the 2018 mini and the 2020 27” 5k iMac.

I wonder if we’ll see a gradual “natural??” drop off of supported Intel Macs due to their transition to Vintage status rather than an “all at once” discontinuation of Intel support. 

WWDC should be interesting, that’s for sure. 

- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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diphtonge
Contributor
Contributor

I am using macOS Monterey and VMware Fusion 13 till my iMac crashed (still an Intel). The attempt to use Time Machine with Recovery Console failed and it told me to install macOS from scratch and to use the Migration assistant. Finally everything went well, only VMware makes problems. When I want to create and start a VM and even when I start an existing VM, then it ends up in "-14 Pipe connection has been broken". In System Settings > Privacy is the access for Accessibility, Files and Folders and even for Full Disk Access granted. Deleting the lck-files/folders has no effect. Deinstalling with AppCleaner and reinstalling has no effect, the issue remains. Something is bent, but what... I am not a professional Log (re)viewer, but it seems a few files or folders can't be found...but why. I attach the vmware.log file and hope it helps to find the issue.

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Technogeezer
Immortal
Immortal

The logs are saying that the Intel chip you have in that Mac is an i7-4790K. Everymac.com indicates the only Mac using that chip is a iMac 5K Late 2014 model. If that's the Mac you have and you are running Monterey 12.6.7 on it, you are most likely running Open Core Legacy Patcher (OCLP) to get Monterey to run.  There are known issues with trying to run Fusion on a Mac that's using OCLP.

The logs are also saying that the virtual machine monitor has abruptly stopped writing entries in the logs. This is one of the issues that has been seen when using OCLP. Another user did some extensive testing and found that OCLP disables AMFI (Apple Mobile File Integrity, one of the core security features of macOS) in order to get its hacked drivers to work. His research showed that disabling AMFI causes a failure of the Apple hypervisor to start a VM.and for the log entries to abruptly end in the same spot as I'm seeing in your logs. 

So from what I see in the logs, it's your macOS version running on unsupported hardware that's "bent". And that's an Open Core issue, not a VMware issue.

That being said, it's possible that something with your Open Core installation isn't quite the same as the way it was before. Perhaps you decided to use a newer version of Open Core during your reinstallation that now does different things to macOS. You might want to take this up with the Open Core community.

 

- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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diphtonge
Contributor
Contributor

Thank you for the deep insight. Indeed I updated with Open Core to use my iMac a little bit longer. I need newer macOS for work. Maybe I have to think about a new one, but currently is VMware not really working comfortable on arm64. I guess you know, anyway thank you.

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SvenGus
Expert
Expert

You could try OCLP with AMFIPass, which eliminates the previous requirement to disable Library Validation and AMFI, and is currently in beta (will soon be merged into the main OCLP):

https://github.com/dortania/OpenCore-Legacy-Patcher/releases/tag/amfipass-beta-test

(Works fine with Fusion on my late 2013 15” MacBook Pro…)

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diphtonge
Contributor
Contributor

Thank you, I will give it a try. But sooner or later I will have to think about to buy a new iMac, even when I love my 27" and think that new ones with only 24" are too small.

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