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Copy VM to a PC?

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I have copied my Fusion created VM to a PC running Windows 7 and opened it with Play. Everything works great. However, how is the folder structure supposed to be for VMs on a PC? My VM does not appear like a package on the PC but appears like a folder with everything in it, including an Applications and Caches folder. Which files/folders are absolutely necessary and which ones can I delete? Also, when VMs are created on a PC, are each VM created in it's own folder, like the structure I have now?

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rcardona2k
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However, how is the folder structure supposed to be for VMs on a PC?

Yes, VMs on PCs are folders as bundles are Mac-only. Keep in mind a Fusion VM is a folder with the special extension of ".vmwarevm"

>My VM does not appear like a package on the PC but appears like a folder with everything in it, including an Applications and Caches folder. Which files/folders are absolutely necessary and which ones can I delete?

Technically Workstation uses a subset of the VM content folders Fusion does so you could safely delete the Applications folder and some folders in appListCache but if you share the VM back and forth, these folders will get regenerated. All the other files especially the .vmx, .vmdk, .vmsn, .vmss, .vsmd and nvram files are important and you shouldn't touch them.

>Also, when VMs are created on a PC, are each VM created in it's own folder, like the structure I have now?

Yes, VMs on a PC are folders except Workstation/Player does create of the same cache folders that Fusion does. To have a Fusion bundle-style VM, you can add the extension ".vmwarevm" to your PC VM folder.

edit: Observed Workstation's use of appData and launchMenu folders for Unity support.

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a_p_
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On Windows, each VM is created in it's own folder by default. You may configure it differently and/or create virtual disks elsewhere though.

The neccessary files are the ones with extensions starting with "vm", like *.vmx, *.vmdk, ... as well as the nvram file.

André

asatoran
Immortal
Immortal

In addition to what has been said, a package is just a special kind of folder. You can view the contents of the package by right-clicking (control-click) on the package, then select Show Package Contents. You could convert the package to a folder or copy VMs created by Workstation/Player to the Mac and run them in Fusion without converting to a package. Fusion can work with either.

In general, I would recommend NOT deleting anything from the package/folder unless you really know what you're doing. At the very least, have a copy of the package/folder, just in case. Smiley Wink

rcardona2k
Immortal
Immortal

However, how is the folder structure supposed to be for VMs on a PC?

Yes, VMs on PCs are folders as bundles are Mac-only. Keep in mind a Fusion VM is a folder with the special extension of ".vmwarevm"

>My VM does not appear like a package on the PC but appears like a folder with everything in it, including an Applications and Caches folder. Which files/folders are absolutely necessary and which ones can I delete?

Technically Workstation uses a subset of the VM content folders Fusion does so you could safely delete the Applications folder and some folders in appListCache but if you share the VM back and forth, these folders will get regenerated. All the other files especially the .vmx, .vmdk, .vmsn, .vmss, .vsmd and nvram files are important and you shouldn't touch them.

>Also, when VMs are created on a PC, are each VM created in it's own folder, like the structure I have now?

Yes, VMs on a PC are folders except Workstation/Player does create of the same cache folders that Fusion does. To have a Fusion bundle-style VM, you can add the extension ".vmwarevm" to your PC VM folder.

edit: Observed Workstation's use of appData and launchMenu folders for Unity support.

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