VMware Communities
greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

20 GB Bootcamp Import Produces a 75 GB HD

When I Import a 20 GB Bootcamp partition the Hard Disk size is listed as 74.5 GB in the Settings menu, which is the total size of the original disk that contains both the Bootcamp partition and an OS X Leopard partition. When I open the package contents of the VM, there is indeed 38 partitions created although most only contain 328KBs, while 10 contain about 2 GB each.

I didn't even notice it until I went to increase the VM disk size, so I don't know if it will eventually cause a problem or not? Unfortunately, the "extra" VM disk partitions are before the actual Bootcamp partitions, so I would still need to increase the disk size further to increase the usable VM size. Another oddity is that the original Boot Camp partition is also listed as 74.5 GB in the Fusion Virtual Machine Library window (I have not used the Bootcamp partition from within Fusion). Obviously Fusion thinks the Bootcamp partition is the entire hard drive size.

Anyone know if this will eventually be a problem, and how to prevent it from happening?

After I noticed this I then tried to use the standalone VM converter program to create a VM and eliminate the "extra" partitions, but it always fails within 1 minute with an error stating its "Unable to create a VSS snapshot of the source volume". I have no idea what that means or what to do about it.

Reply
0 Kudos
1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
WoodyZ
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

Yes, it is the normal and expected behavior, although not wanted by many (if not most) users and you can use various methods to make use of the additional space if wanted and using gparted is just one of many ways. Also have a look at .

Also "... there is indeed 38 partitions ..." There are not 38 partitions, those are nothing more then disk files representing the 2 GB segments of a split disk.

View solution in original post

Reply
0 Kudos
15 Replies
greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

Can anyone please tell me if this is normal Fusion behavior when importing a BootCamp (Win XP) partition?

Perhaps I didn't make "the issue" clear? I have a hard disk in a Mac-mini with a 20 GB BootCamp partition and a 54.5 GB OS X partition. When I import the BootCamp partition to create a new VM the resulting VM size is identified in the Settings window as being 74.5 GB rather than 20 GB. When I open the VM package there are indeed 38 separate partitions (as there would be if the VM was really 74.5 GB) but the first 18 of the partitions only contain about 328 KB's, i.e. the VM can not grow above the 20 GB's of the original BootCamp partition size. I even used the gparted--live utility (with the intention of increasing the VM's actual 20 GB capacity) and it shows a 20 GB usable partition and a separate 54 GB "unknown file type" partition.

I'd just like to know if this is normal behavior when importing a BootCamp partition? Or do I need to "fix" the BootCamp partition somehow before importing?

Reply
0 Kudos
WoodyZ
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

Yes, it is the normal and expected behavior, although not wanted by many (if not most) users and you can use various methods to make use of the additional space if wanted and using gparted is just one of many ways. Also have a look at .

Also "... there is indeed 38 partitions ..." There are not 38 partitions, those are nothing more then disk files representing the 2 GB segments of a split disk.

Reply
0 Kudos
WoodyZ
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

Have a look at my reply to to get some perspective on this issue.

greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

Thanks WoodyZ. It's good to know that is expected behavior so I won't try to figure out what might have been wrong with the original BootCamp partition.

I tried to use gparted (booting the iso image from the VM) but I couldn't use it because the perceived mouse location in the gparted GUI was wildly wrong from the visible on-screen position of the mouse (using an iMac with wireless Magic Mouse). I may try a USB mouse, but I doubt that was the problem.

Any experience with this mouse problem?

The "extra" 55 GB's from the original OS X partition showed up in gparted as a separate partition located before the "real" 20 GB partition from BootCamp (not surprising given the numbering scheme of the "extra" partition segments in the Fusion VM package). So I'm not sure how easily it would be to reclaim that "extra" partition for the VM, given that I have no experience with gparted.

In any event, it seems like I can just increase the size of the 75 GB VM disk further, and then resize the Win XP partition using gparted (if I can get the mouse to work) or use another utility, and ignore the "extra" 55 GB of reported disk. The "extra" 55 GB size really only consumes about 10 MB of actual disk space.

Finally, I think all of this could be avoided using the VMware Converter because it provided the option of only selecting the 20 GB Bootcamp partition, and not the 55 GB OS X partition, but alas I got the "VSS errors", whatever they are I mentioned in my initial post, and that didn't work. Any thoughts on the "VSS errors"?

Thanks for the pointers to the documents. I'll read them now.

Reply
0 Kudos
greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

Wow, many thanks WoodyZ. It looks like my original size question and the solution (including a free utility that should work) was covered in the Re: Counterintuitive Instructions from VMWare on Resizing Virtual Disk thread. I did search before asking my questions, but I didn't find that thread.

Reply
0 Kudos
continuum
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

while trying gparted set guesOS to Linux - then hopefully the mouse will behave itself




___________________________________

VMX-parameters- Workstation FAQ -[ MOA-liveCD|http://sanbarrow.com/moa241.html] - VM-Sickbay


________________________________________________
Do you need support with a VMFS recovery problem ? - send a message via skype "sanbarrow"
I do not support Workstation 16 at this time ...

Reply
0 Kudos
WoodyZ
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

while trying gparted set guesOS to Linux - then hopefully the mouse will behave itself

A Windows XP Virtual Machine created with default USB settings in Fusion 2.x and 3.x (including a imported Boot Camp partition Virtual Machine) contain the following parameters that interfere when booted using a Linux Live OS CD/DVD/ISO Image like GParted Live and some other Linux Live OS CD/DVD/ISO Images like Knoppix, etc.

usb:0.deviceType = "mouse"
usb:0.present = "TRUE"

Changing the OS Type to Linux does not change the above parameters and they need to be manually changed and the last one in the list below needs to be added as well.

usb:0.deviceType = "mouse"
usb:0.present = "FALSE"
mouse.vusb.enable = "FALSE"

The other option is to temporarily remove the USB Controller from the Windows XP Virtual Machine Settings while using GParted Live.

continuum
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

Thanks WoodyZ

good to know - on the other platforms changing to Linux is enough - did not know that on Fusion it is not so easy




___________________________________

VMX-parameters- Workstation FAQ -[ MOA-liveCD|http://sanbarrow.com/moa241.html] - VM-Sickbay


________________________________________________
Do you need support with a VMFS recovery problem ? - send a message via skype "sanbarrow"
I do not support Workstation 16 at this time ...

Reply
0 Kudos
greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

WoodyZ - Unfortunately, after using Easeus Partition Master to resize the Win XP partition to use the unallocated partition segments (that Fusion wrongly included when importing the Bootcamp partition) the result is really bad because the space used on the OS X physical disc is doubled. The 20 GB's from the original Bootcamp partition, which appear at the end of the "75 GB" Virtual Disk partition segments are copied (not moved) to the beginning Virtual Disk partition segments. Hence, the "75 GB" Virtual Disk now occupies 40 GB rather than 20 GB on the OS X physical disc, even though only 20 GB is actually used by Win XP on the virtual disk. I hope that is clear.

I can see two potential ways to reclaim the unused 20 GB physical disc space at the end of the virtual disc.

1) Shrink the virtual disc using the Shrink process in the VM Tools (which is accessed from within Win XP).

2) Use the Disk Cleanup process (I don't know what that is actually intended to do) that is included in the virtual machine Settings menu.

Unfortunately, the documentation indicates that it may take hours to run either of these two processes. Hence, I'm asking here first, do you know if either of the these processes will actually reclaim the 20 GB's of physical disc space?

If neither of them will reclaim the 20 GB's, then it is obviously better to simply increase the size of the 75 GB virtual disc further (which is really only 20 GB of useable Win XP space) and then expand the Win XP partition appropriately, rather than try to use the unallocated space in the virtual disc that results from importing Bootcamp. That way the physical disc space is only 20 GB until more space is actually used in the Win XP partition.

In my opinion, this entire situation is a ridiculous flaw in VMware Fusion. Fusion should have NEVER created the 75 GB virtual disc (i.e. the entire size of the original physical disk that contained the Bootcamp partition) in the first place. It should have only created a virtual disc the size of the Bootcamp partition. I don't mind doing a little clean up work after importing a Bootcamp partition but this is silly.

Reply
0 Kudos
WoodyZ
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

Attach a screenshot of the Disk Manager in Windows.

Reply
0 Kudos
greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

OK Disk Management window attached.

Reply
0 Kudos
WoodyZ
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

Shrinking the disk using VMware Tools from within Windows will reclaim the Guest's unused space taken up on the Host's filesystem.

Reply
0 Kudos
greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

Ok I'll try that. Thanks for the reply.

Would you mind saying what you were looking for in the Disk Manager window that told you that?

Also what does the Disk Cleanup process in the Settings menu do?

Reply
0 Kudos
WoodyZ
Immortal
Immortal
Jump to solution

Would you mind saying what you were looking for in the Disk Manager window that told you that?

I could tell you but then I'd have to... ! Smiley Wink

Just Kidding! Smiley Happy

It wasn't just information in Disk Manager and I asked for a screenshot because it gives me more information in a quick glimpse then having to ask you several questions and it ensures me of accurate information with no misunderstanding of the questions I'd have to ask and saves us both time in not having to type as much. (Except when having to explain a previous answer) Smiley Wink

Actually I used several bits of information from the entire thread and used the screenshot as a final check to corroborate the actual state of the virtual hard drive after you used Easeus.

Also what does the Disk Cleanup process in the Settings menu do?

Have a look at: VMware Fusion (menu bar) > Help > Search > type Clean and then select Clean Up a Hard Disk

You can use this after shrinking from within Windows to derfrag the virtual hard drive on the Host's filesystem. This is different then defrag in the Guest OS filesystem.

Reply
0 Kudos
greg409
Contributor
Contributor
Jump to solution

OK, Shrinking using VM Tools (that was installed in Win XP) fixed the problem. And in my case, surprisingly only took about 14 minutes running time.

The 75 GB virtual drive (the original size of the physical drive that contained Bootcamp on my first Mac) now only occupies approximately 20 GB of physical drive space again on my 2nd Mac (approximately the space actually used in Win XP), and the Win XP C: drive has increased to 75 GB (increased from the original 20 GB Bootcamp partition).

That was my desired outcome - to move my Bootcamp partition (soon to be deleted) on one Mac, to a Virtual Machine providing a larger C:drive on another Mac, while minimizing the physical drive space occupied on the 2nd Mac.

Thanks for your patience and guidance WoodyZ. VMware owes you a lot for providing workarounds to their problems and incomplete documentation.

-


So after two days of effort I conclude that to make an independent virtual machine from a Bootcamp partition there are two "cookbook" alternatives:

A) To make a Bootcamp partition into an independent virtual machine WITHOUT increasing the original Bootcamp (Win XP) C: drive size:

1) Import using the Fusion Import function and ignore the VM reported disk size (which will be the size of the original physical disk that contained the Bootcamp partition). The usable VM (Win XP) partition size will be the original Bootcamp partition size.

B) To make a Bootcamp partition into an independent virtual machine and increase the VM (Win XP) partition size to the original physical disk size:

1) Import using the Fusion Import function.

2) Use the free Easeus Partition Master (from within the Win XP virtual machine) to resize the Win XP partition to the full size of the virtual disk (which is the size of the original physical disk that contained the Bootcamp partition). This has the side-effect of immediately doubling the OS X physical disk space occupied by the virtual disk, i.e. it will be approximately 2x the original Bootcamp partition size.

3) Use VMware Tools (installed automatically in Win XP) to shrink the virtual disk's physical disk space back to (approximately) the size of the original Bootcamp partition. The Win XP partition will remain the same as the virtual disk size (the original physical disk size). The OS X physical disk space will thereafter increase as the Win XP partition space is used, up to the size of the virtual disk.

If it is necessary to increase the virtual machine Win XP partition size beyond what is provided by A) or B) above, then first increase the disk size in the Fusion Settings menu, and second use Easeus Partition Master to increase the Win XP partition size.

Reply
0 Kudos