c0l2e
Contributor
Contributor

RuntimeFault: Database temporarily unavailable or has network problems.

RuntimeFault: Database temporarily unavailable or has network problems.

I always received that message when creating new Administrator from local users in Linux or

adding user permission on a specific Virtual Machine.

how can I fix this??

3955_3955.png

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21 Replies
Constan
Contributor
Contributor

I have the same problem. I hope it am soon repaired.

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JWDenecamp
Contributor
Contributor

It would be great if someone at VMWare would reply to this and tell the public if there is a fix coming or not.

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drossgatech
Contributor
Contributor

I dont know what the offical patch will be but here is a workaround I found translating a German document I found.

/etc/init.d/vmware-mgmt stop

vi /etc/vmware/hostd/authorization.xml

edit the line that talks about

<NextAceId>11</NextAceId>

incrament it past the current "root" or administrator account you have.

so it now reads

<NextAceId>12</NextAceId>

I also deleted

<NextRoleId>11</NextRoleId>

doesnt seem to be used anywhere

I then

/etc/init.d/vmware-mgmt start

and relogged in.

I was then able to add users. Looks like the initial script doesnt incrament well and keeps trying to add you to an existing userid. I dunno why they didnt just use the userid for the users in /etc/password or ldap.

hope that helps

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Constan
Contributor
Contributor

I already found that, however the server falls then with me.

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JWDenecamp
Contributor
Contributor

This worked great! Thanks for the help. I used a different Admin so I had to specify the UID for the user I created to be the admin. Very easy fix.

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jfoo
Contributor
Contributor

Same problem here. Same fix. Thanks.

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admin
Immortal
Immortal

Shouldn't this be in the Server 2.0 discussion, and not the VIX API discussion?

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barnys
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

what difference does it make where it is being posted as long as it provides a viable solution?

FYI folks - I tried this out and it worked on my setup. Thanks for sharing.

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ctgrubbs
Contributor
Contributor

My thanks as well...worked perfectly

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gervaisb
Contributor
Contributor

I have got the same problem. VUt this was just a missing access right to the vmware files.

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MaskedMarauder
Contributor
Contributor

Worked perfectly. THANK YOU!

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slabadmin
Contributor
Contributor

The posted fix that seems to have helped everyone else did not work for me. What worked for me was the following:

My setup is CentOS 5.2, VMware Server 2.0.

On initial config using vmware-config.pl, I specified a user other than root as the administrative user. That user was then unable to add permissions. I ran vmware-config.pl again and specified a different uesr as teh administrative user to no avail. That user could not add permissions. I then ran vmware-config.pl again and specified root as the administrative user. I was then able to login as root through the Web UI and add permissions. It was an unfortunate fix, as I would prefer not to have the root account directly accessible from any remote interface. As such, I then logged in as one of the newly added administrators and removed root's permissions, which prevented root from logging in.

Keep your heels low and center your gravity.

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rokla
Contributor
Contributor

In linux systems the problem is, that vmware-config create the folder /etc/vmware/hostd for user and group root. if you chose another user as administrator for your vmware-enviroment, you won't be able to write into this file, but you need to do, if you want to change and/or add permissions for virtual machines. so the workaround, which works for me and which is still secure, is to give the files in /etc/vmware/hostd group-rights to your administrator-user and allow write-right to the group, e.g. if your administrator-user is "admin" then you should have a group called "admin" (in debian-system this is standard), which one and only member is the user "admin"and change permissions as follows

chgrp admin /etc/vmware/hostd/*

chmod g+w /etc/vmware/hostd/*

Actually you dont need to change permissions for all files, but I'm to lazy to find out, which files will be affected and I want to prevent future permission problems, so I change permissions for the whole directory.

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StuartRothrock
Contributor
Contributor

Both entries are used in my authorization.xml

I don't think I will ever approach 100 Roles (AceId) so this is what I used.

<NextAceId>12</NextAceId>

<NextRoleId>111</NextRoleId>

As roles are added, they have low numbers and as members are added, they get the high numbers.

I think their terms are not applied correctly.

Cheers!

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DerekShaw
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

spent a couple of hours running this to the ground.

first we changed permission on /etc/vmware/hostd and files therein, to no effect.

next we uninstalled vmware server 2.0 and cleaned up the OS to remove all remnants thereof. Re-installed vmware server 2.0, and this time chose root as the default administrator (it was previously another user with sudoers privilges). This allowed us to add exactly one (1) user in the permissions tab for the host.

next we edited /etc/vmware/hostd/authorization.xml as described by drossgatech

This fixed it. We can now add as many groups and users in the permissions tab as we desire.

So the bug is that the "add permissions" code seems unable to increment the counter past 11, when it is at 11. Changing the counter to the correct number higher than 11 fixes the problem, and the counter then increments correctly.

my vote is for drossgatech to get credit for the correct answer, and for someone in the Server 2.0 team to have a look at the incrementing code for "new permissions"

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GeroldGruber
Contributor
Contributor

just had to increment NextAceId one time, afterwards it worked for the next accounts.

Thanks for this solution.

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dajomas
Contributor
Contributor

I noticed an additional thing here. I was able to add 1 permission and after that, I received the same error message. I then followed the steps from drossgatech but it still didn't work. Then I had a look at the file /etc/vmware/hostd/authorization.xml and noticed that the order in which the entries appeard was: id 11 followed by id 10 and the NextAceId was 11 (I also tried 12 but that didn't work either)

I then swapped the order of the entries so that 10 came first, followed by 11 and set the NextAceId to 12 and that fixed my problem.

Hope this helps the others who were still running into the problem

Greetinx

Johan

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buggycode
Contributor
Contributor

Hi

Months on, Vmware Server 2.01 and this still seems to be a problem. Some of the perissions have worked. I just added another system and attmpeted to give and existing user and role permission of that role. Bang got this error message!

What is going on?

Gehrard

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admin
Immortal
Immortal

Hi

Months on, Vmware Server 2.01 and this still seems to be a problem. Some of the perissions have worked. I just added another system and attmpeted to give and existing user and role permission of that role. Bang got this error message!

What is going on?

Hi guys,

Mattrich is right (way above in the thread) that the only way to get progress on this problem is by bringing it up in the VMware Server forum.

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