Ubuntu111
Contributor
Contributor

How do I put ISOs in the vmimages folder on local storage???

I am using WinSCP to upload ISOs to an ESXi 3.5 host. I am able to browse to /vmfs/volumes/local datastore and upload the ISOs to there, but how do I get those ISOs to the vmimages folder that appears when browsing the datastore from VIC? Thanks!!!

4 Replies
lamw
Community Manager
Community Manager

You should not put files in that directory as it's for the VMware Tools that's provided by VMware and any drivers for guestOSes like pvscsi. In general, you'll want a datastore dedicated or shared to host your ISOs. The other piece of it, you don't' want to fill your local ESX/ESXi host with iso as you'll run out of space very quickly. However, if you're still inclined to, the only way is to login to the host to move the .iso files which requires unsupported Busybox console access on ESXi. Definitely don't recommend it, there won't be enough space to store large ISOs

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Troy_Clavell
Immortal
Immortal

It may be easier just to upload your ISO images somewhere other than the /vmimages folder.

See below

http://communities.vmware.com/thread/122724

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athlon_crazy
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

You mean, you want ISOs image in VM folder? If yes, you can :

  • vi-client - browse datastore, copy iso & paste to VM folder

  • unsupported esxi bash use $cp or $mv command to copy or move iso to VM folder

But why put in VM folder?

vcbMC-1.0.6 Beta

vcbMC-1.0.7 Lite

http://www.no-x.org
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DSTAVERT
Immortal
Immortal

You are likely to break upgrades. ESXi uses less than 1GB regardless of how large a disk you install it on.

-- David -- VMware Communities Moderator
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