jftwp
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Patches for ESX 3.5 Update 4 (build 153875, release date 2009/03/30)

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I'm updating our company's ESX build document for new servers, and one of the steps--after installing ESX 3.5 U4--is to obtain the latest 'CRITICAL' patches from

We're not using Update Manager -


not yet -


don't ask. We're still happy with esxupdate. Anyway, I went to and sadly, I'm a bit confused where the ESX 3.5 stuff is concerned. But after some trial and error on using this site, I think I've found the following to be true:

1. Disregard ANY patches dated 03/30/2009, as those are already installed with the ISO image of ESX 3.5 U4. This was confirmed via 'esxupdate query'. It shows these all listed/installed. I guess this makes sense, since the release data of ESX 3.5 U4 / Build 153875 is just that----03/30/2009.

2. List any/all ESX 3.5 patches, all classifications, and sort by date. This will show the patches AFTER 03/30/2009, which are the ONLY patches truly made available AFTER the ESX 3.5 U4 / Build 153875 iso image was released for downloading. This truly results in listing any/all patches available SINCE Build 153875 actually came out. As of today, ther are 10 patches with April 2009 dates, and 5 patches with May 2009 dates.

I'm sure many of you already know all this, but since I'm new to 3.5 builds, and haven't used that 'self service' site in quite a while, it took me a while to 'figure this out'. I'm also curious if anyone has related feedback.

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savantsingh
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

If you are looking to document a procedure, your best bet would be to include:

Check the release date of the iso before you proceed the installation.

Based on the release date check any patches which were released after that release date. That means all those patches would be new ones which would not be a part of the iso image.

Hope this helps.

If you found this information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

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Rumple
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

I would recommend you use Update manager to SCAN for the patches. This is a benign check and will not cause any issues with running servers.

You can then look at the list of critical outstanding patches and install them manually if required.

I think update manager just runs an esxupdate -query on the host and compares it to an xml file update manager downloads...it then presents the differences...

jftwp
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Thanks for the feedback. Marked as helpful. We're not using Update Manager just yet, but we'll get there.

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avlieshout
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

When not using Update manager, maybe you should check out this esx-autopatch.pl script.

I use it in my unattended installaion script, to automatically aply all the post Update4 patches. This way I won't have to use Update Manager after a fresh install, which saves me a lot of time because Update Manager is way to slow (in my opinion) in aplying patches.

-Arnim van Lieshout

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Arnim van Lieshout Blogging: http://www.van-lieshout.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/avlieshout If you find this information useful, please award points for "correct" or "helpful".
savantsingh
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

If you are looking to document a procedure, your best bet would be to include:

Check the release date of the iso before you proceed the installation.

Based on the release date check any patches which were released after that release date. That means all those patches would be new ones which would not be a part of the iso image.

Hope this helps.

If you found this information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

View solution in original post

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