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Zrubi
Contributor
Contributor

How to prevent vmnic renumbering

I'm found lots of topic about how to renumbering back the vmnic numbers after a hardvare upgrade:

http://www.vmware.com/community/thread.jspa?messageID=477265

http://www.vmware.com/community/thread.jspa?messageID=551433

and so on..

All is in answered state, but the real question is how to prevent this crappy renumbering?

It's nonsense that after a simple nic upgrade the hole server is unusable. And the worst that it can only be corrected on the console. It's werid in a 'datacenter product'

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oreeh
Immortal
Immortal

You simply can't.

The NIC numbers depend on the PCI bus and device ID.

If you plug a new card in this numbering changes and therefore the ESX NIC numbering has to change.

If you are lucky your HW manufacturer provides some documentation regarding PCI slot and bus numbering to avoid this.

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Zrubi
Contributor
Contributor

Well, we are managing more than 100 linux servers remotely. Never ever saw this issue that an onboard nic get a new id. The only thing can happend is the order of your interfaces cards will change, but you can fix this issue easily

My real problem is that I can't go to the console for every new interface card inserted...

an example:

05:04.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82541PI Gigabit Ethernet Controller (rev 05)

06:00.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5721 Gigabit Ethernet (rev 01)

07:00.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5721 Gigabit Ethernet (rev 01)

vmnic6 05:04.00 e1000 Up 100Mbps Full Intel Corporation 82541PI Gigabit Ethernet Controller

vmnic7 06:00.00 tg3 Up 1000Mbps Full Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5721 Gigabit Ethernet

vmnic0 07:00.00 tg3 Up 1000Mbps Full Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5721 Gigabit Ethernet

We can agree that the broadcom nics will never change their PCI id..

Not even our MAC id (if you don't do it somehow)

I dont understand why the old onboard nics getting a new id if I'm inserting a new card into the server. Every operating system I used (even the windows ones) are able to handle it without such problems.

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oreeh
Immortal
Immortal

It depends on the PCI slot you use.

There are servers out there which use a "stupid" PCI bus numbering

Real world expample:

PCI Bus 4: PCI-e slots

PCI Bus 5: onboard

PCI Bus 6: PCI-X slots

If you used PCI-X cards and now plug a PCI-e card in ...

mikemohr
Contributor
Contributor

The HP DL585 G2 is a perfect example of this. The north bridge contains the onboard nics and a couple of the PCI slots, the other PCI slots are on the south bridge, so only some of the NICs change their addressing. An example, I had three dual port NICs plus the two on-board in our server:

vmnic0 - console

vmnic2 - VM Backup net

vmnic3 - vMotion

vmnic5 - VM Production

vmnic7 - VM Production

We added a fourth nic to split some of the load up and now it looks like this:

vmnic0 - console

vmnic2 - VM backup net

vmnic5 - vMotion

vmnic7 - VM Production

vmnic9 - VM Production

http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00231623/c00231623.pdf - Page 4 has the diagram.

In theory, you should not have to change your individual VMs because you could vmotion the vm's off the host, add the nic, and vmotion them back. As long as the portgroup name is the same and the network is visible it should work just fine.

Zrubi
Contributor
Contributor

Thanks for these info...

It's means for me I can't allow any hardware upgrade without an administrator on site. Smiley Sad

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