skilachi2
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Enthusiast

How to check ISO space on ESX 3.0.2 machine

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Hello

How do i check the space left for the ISO images. At the moment i've got an iso image of Windows 2003 server (556MB) but when I tried uploading another iso image of Windows Vista or Windows 2008 server of over 2-3GB using Veeam FastSCP i'm getting error message regarding no enough space after almost copying to 100%.

Not sure if the ISO space is the Extended partition with 2.55GB space and if so, how can I increase to about 4-5GB since I still have over 100GB of space left for new VM's?

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patrickds
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Expert

# df

Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/sda2 5036316 1872876 2907608 40% /

this shows you have only 2907608 KB free on / (about 2.8 GB), so you DVD iso will definitely not fit.

Not really any cause for concern of filling your / , i missed the fact that it was a DVD image in you original post.

# vdf

/vmfs/volumes/4721ef62-caf67665-327f-0010180daa21

304611328 187820032 116791296 61% /vmfs/volumes/storage1

like you said, 100GB free on the VMFS volume

create a new directory there, and use that to store your isos

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patrickds
Expert
Expert

do you know where you are storing the isos?

If your using the /vmimages directory, it's on the / filesystem, the root filesystem of the ESX host.

If you're getting an error about not enough space, i would get very concerned, because running out of space on your / filesystem is a very bad situation (causes a lot of errors)

If you're having enough space left on the VMFS (the 100 GB you're talking about), just create a new directory on there, and use that directory for iso storage.

To be sure, i would also move all existing isos from /vmimages to the new directory.

You can check diskpace usage with the df command

the vdf command will also show usage of vmfs filesystems.

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skilachi2
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Enthusiast

Hi,

Yes the iso are stored in

Storage 1 =====> /vmimages ======> Created a folder called HallisonISO....Below is the extract from the vd/vdf command.

login as: root

password:

Last login: Mon Feb 25 12:51:59 2008 from 192.168.1.100

# df

Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/sda2 5036316 1872876 2907608 40% /

/dev/sda1 101089 29673 66197 31% /boot

none 148240 0 148240 0% /dev/shm

/dev/sda6 2008108 74352 1831748 4% /var/log

# vdf

Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/sda2 5036316 1872876 2907608 40% /

/dev/sda1 101089 29673 66197 31% /boot

none 148240 0 148240 0% /dev/shm

/dev/sda6 2008108 74352 1831748 4% /var/log

/vmfs/devices 617183234 0 617183234 0% /vmfs/devices

/vmfs/volumes/4721ef62-caf67665-327f-0010180daa21

304611328 187820032 116791296 61% /vmfs/volumes/storage1

#

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patrickds
Expert
Expert

# df

Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/sda2 5036316 1872876 2907608 40% /

this shows you have only 2907608 KB free on / (about 2.8 GB), so you DVD iso will definitely not fit.

Not really any cause for concern of filling your / , i missed the fact that it was a DVD image in you original post.

# vdf

/vmfs/volumes/4721ef62-caf67665-327f-0010180daa21

304611328 187820032 116791296 61% /vmfs/volumes/storage1

like you said, 100GB free on the VMFS volume

create a new directory there, and use that to store your isos

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I know disk space has been getting cheaper but ever since the newer VIclients have allowed you to connect to a iso or cdrom locally I've seen most companies move away from storing software iso's on the SAN or local storage. Unless your not using templates and your building each guest from scratch everytime it would seem like using the space for more guests would be more cost effective.

Cheers! If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".
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patrickds
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Expert

You need Virtual Center for templates, and since the OP is using local storage, i'm guessing he only has one ESX host and probably no VC.

And even with VC, a CD iso for Windows 2003, for example, is only about 600MB, an installed 2003 VM will take about 10 times that much, and so will the template.

So using a template is definitely not saving diskspace.

Building a VM from an iso on the datastore is way faster than over the network from a CD mounted by the VI client (even a lot faster than using the CDrom drive on the host).

Last time i did it, i installed a complete W2003 VM in less than 30 minutes, using an iso. Try that over the network or from a CDrom drive.

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