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nick_sullivan
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ESX Host, 64-bit VM's or not?

Is it just me or is the 64-bit check iso woefully under documented by VMware? I guess I should be glad I don't have to read hex values in this version.

Can someone elaborate on "longmode"? What is it? Does it mean that I can run 64-bit machines in some sort of handicapped mode? I've searched here, google, and vmware for more info to no avail.

Appreciate it!

Nick

TEST: 56983 : CPUID CHANCE : 340063

Reporting CPUID for 8 Logical CPUs…

All CPUs are identical

Family: Of Model: 04 Stepping: 1

=========================

Vendor: \----


Intel

Processor Cores: \----


1

SSE Support: \----


SSE3

Supports NX / ED: \----


Yes

Supports 64 – bit Longmode: \----


Yes

Supports 64 – bit Vmware: \----


No

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ErMaC1
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64-bit Longmode means the CPU has EMT64 (for Intel) or AMD64 (for AMD).

However, this does not mean necessarily that you can run 64-bit VMs on the server in question. If it's an AMD Opteron Revision E or later, you're fine, and all you need is the AMD64 extensions, which means 64-bit for VMware would read Yes.

Intel chips with EMT64 do not implement memory segmentation, which means on an Intel chip you also need the VT extensions to run 64-bit VMs. This is why on Intel CPUs you can have 64-bit Longmode = yes and still have 64-bit VMware = no. If your Intel CPU is missing VT, then no 64-bit VMs.

From page 29 of the Installation and Upgrade Guide:

There are specific hardware requirements for 64-bit guest operating system support. For AMD Opteron-based systems, the processors must be Opteron Rev E and later. For Intel Xeon-based systems, the processors must include support for Intel's Virtualization Technology (VT). Note that many servers that include CPUs with VT support might ship with VT disabled by default, and VT must be enabled manually. If your CPUs support VT but you do not see this option in the BIOS, contact your vendor to request a BIOS version that allows you to enable VT support.

To determine whether your server has the necessary support, you can use a CPU Compatibility Tool included on the ESX Server product CD-ROM in /images/cpuid.iso.[/i]

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nick_sullivan
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Apparently this is confusing for everyone else too!

If anyone does figure out the answer to my question please let me know.

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admin
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As far as I know all that is required to run 64-bit VMs is a 64-bit proc that has hardware cirtualisation support, be that Interl-VT or AMD SVM.

Not sure what the CPUID output means exactly, but does your proc support both of the above? It might be that it's a 64-bit but not VT/SVM, thus it's 64-bit but can't run 64-bit VMs.

ErMaC1
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64-bit Longmode means the CPU has EMT64 (for Intel) or AMD64 (for AMD).

However, this does not mean necessarily that you can run 64-bit VMs on the server in question. If it's an AMD Opteron Revision E or later, you're fine, and all you need is the AMD64 extensions, which means 64-bit for VMware would read Yes.

Intel chips with EMT64 do not implement memory segmentation, which means on an Intel chip you also need the VT extensions to run 64-bit VMs. This is why on Intel CPUs you can have 64-bit Longmode = yes and still have 64-bit VMware = no. If your Intel CPU is missing VT, then no 64-bit VMs.

From page 29 of the Installation and Upgrade Guide:

There are specific hardware requirements for 64-bit guest operating system support. For AMD Opteron-based systems, the processors must be Opteron Rev E and later. For Intel Xeon-based systems, the processors must include support for Intel's Virtualization Technology (VT). Note that many servers that include CPUs with VT support might ship with VT disabled by default, and VT must be enabled manually. If your CPUs support VT but you do not see this option in the BIOS, contact your vendor to request a BIOS version that allows you to enable VT support.

To determine whether your server has the necessary support, you can use a CPU Compatibility Tool included on the ESX Server product CD-ROM in /images/cpuid.iso.[/i]

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