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TerrenceRocks
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Installing ESX 3.5 on New Desktop for test, Error Network Not found

I am installing for test purposes and keep getting the error Netork not found, the install reboots and repeats the error.

This is ontop of SUSE, and Sever 2003, and Server 2008

This is a Dual Core HP Desktop, I even installed the oldest 3com card as well, figuring it would figure that out. Do you have to have a Base OS with a Static IP????

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Dave_Mishchenko
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There will be a couple of things to getting ESX to install on this PC. First you'll need a NIC that ESX can recognize. I would suggest an Intel Pro/1000 GT - you can pick these up for about $35. Then there will be storage. Do you know what sort of disk controller the PC has? ESX is supported on a limited number of SCSI / SAS controllers, but will reconginize and install on a number of SATA controllers (e.g. Intel ICH*, nVididia MPC xx). CPU wise, if you want to run x64 VMs then you'll need a x64 CPU with Intel VT. You can use the bootable ISO found here http://www.vmware.com/download/shared_utilities.html to check the capabilities of the CPU in the PC.

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RParker
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The problem is ESX is looking for compatible hardware. When you install ESX as a VM, those other VM servers install their own NIC, which is not a known hardware that ESX can recognize, so it's probably not going to work.

The best way to solve this is install ESX bare metal on that machine, of course if that machine isn't on the HCL, you are on your own.

azn2kew
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Can you clarify a little bit about your hardware specs and what you're trying to accomplish. If you need to install ESX 3.5 on your desktop machine than it must meet the HCL list. Please check to see if your controller, NICs are compatible. If you're installing ESX 3.5 with SusE, Windows 2003/2008 than I'm thinking you using Workstation 6.0 version technique from Xtravirt.com website? If so, all you have to check if your BIOS has Virtualization Technology (VT) enable on your BIOS, if not than you can't run ESX 3.5.

I'm not sure which one is which so clarify a little bit would help.

If you found this information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful". Thanks!!!

Regards,

Stefan Nguyen

iGeek Systems LLC.

VMware, Citrix, Microsoft Consultant

If you found this information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful". Thanks!!! Regards, Stefan Nguyen VMware vExpert 2009 iGeek Systems Inc. VMware vExpert, VCP 3 & 4, VSP, VTSP, CCA, CCEA, CCNA, MCSA, EMCSE, EMCISA
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TerrenceRocks
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It is bare metal, but a workstation, and newer HP with probably a Broadcom Gig network card, not sure if it has Virtualization support in the Bios, I am going to check that. I am taking a VMware class this coming monday. I wanted to be able to load several versions of Linux to learn it and successfully loaded workstation, I think I will just go back to Vmware workstation or Microsofts version for testing, it is more compatable with whats out there in hardware.

NOTE: I added the most common 3com card known to man, and the Broadcom Gig is the same but new, so if it cannot find the two most common network cards in the universe, it has to be the cmos.

Found a little more info: Workstation is Compaq Presario SR5233WM Desktop PC,Pentium D 9xx with Dual Core technology ,Chipset Intel 94

  • Motherboard manufacturer's name: ASUS IPILP-LC

  • HP/Compaq name: Lancaster8-GL6 5GC,System BIOS core brand: AMI, On board Lan:

    • Realtek RTL8101E 10/100 Mbps LAN PHY

    • Uses a PCIe x1 lane (This is not the same as using a PCIe x1 slot) Plus I have installed a 3com Barracuda PCI 10/100 that is a very common network card.

    • I am going to check the bios next

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Datto
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Even if you have hardware virtualization built into your BIOS and CPU, you won't be able to run VMs under ESX 3.5 when ESX 3.5 is running as a VM under Workstation .6.0.3. You'd have to use ESX 3.0.2 instead of ESX 3.5 but that would still require hardware virtualization in your BIOS and your CPU.

Some of the Pentium D 9xx had hardware virtualization in the CPU but not all of them. You might look here -- your looking for a processor that has "Virtualization Technology" (also called VT) listed as a feature :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Pentium_D_microprocessors

Datto

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TerrenceRocks
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I think I will just run VMware server and wait until I finish the class, it is just for an Easy way to load multiple Operating systems to learn them anyway, I will be attending a 5 day boot camp for Vmware, so I will have the lowdown next week. It has requirements, that are missing. I am booting Vmware ESx 3.5 from a DVD and it does not recognize Realtek or 3Com, but it might be deeper, like the Cmos, I will try another Nic card if I have time. I just Loaded Mac OS10 on the machine for kicks and will dust that off tomorrow. Funny thing I searched the Knowledge base over and over and did not find anything.

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Dave_Mishchenko
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There will be a couple of things to getting ESX to install on this PC. First you'll need a NIC that ESX can recognize. I would suggest an Intel Pro/1000 GT - you can pick these up for about $35. Then there will be storage. Do you know what sort of disk controller the PC has? ESX is supported on a limited number of SCSI / SAS controllers, but will reconginize and install on a number of SATA controllers (e.g. Intel ICH*, nVididia MPC xx). CPU wise, if you want to run x64 VMs then you'll need a x64 CPU with Intel VT. You can use the bootable ISO found here http://www.vmware.com/download/shared_utilities.html to check the capabilities of the CPU in the PC.

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TerrenceRocks
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Thanks, I got some Intel Server Nics somewhere, the PC is 64 capable, but no mention of virtualization in the CMOS, that is only within the last year or so since that came about, found in servers and just recently in workstations, so far as I know. I will follow your advice and see what happens.

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