VMware Cloud Community
TedH256
Expert
Expert

"FailBack"?? Don't I have to break and re-create sync mirrors first?

So, I am being told that with SRM5 you can simply "reprotect" your protection groups and then "failback".

But - how does this work? I am not aware that NetApp, or HP EVA, or HP P4000 or even EMC VNX (among others) offer a "2 way" replication feature.

So, for SRM I have to create a "mirror" (different vendors call it different things) going from protected to recovery sites. If there is a failover, then the LUNs at "protected site" are not writeable any longer, and as long as the recovery side stays active, then the recovery side LUNs are accumulating data that the protected side LUNs no longer have. The "mirror" has to be broken, the protected site luns have to be brought back online and then a mirror has to be created recovery site --->protected site to get the LUNs back up to date.

THEN and ONLY then can I do a "failback" - is that not correct?

The SRM product manuals and the instructors, seem to want us to believe that we can just click "reprotect" and "failback" and ... it will just work automagically - but I do not think that is correct.

Am I missing something?

Thnx for clearing it up!

0 Kudos
3 Replies
mal_michael
Commander
Commander

SRM will reverse the replication via SRA.

Please read the "Understanding Reprotection" section of the admin guide.

Also the following blog post might be helpful:

http://blogs.vmware.com/uptime/2011/07/failback-where-is-the-button.html

Michael.

0 Kudos
sparrowangelste
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

in SRM when you failover your source site then becomes your DR, and your DR is now the source because that is where your production data is running.

--------------------- Sparrowangelstechnology : Vmware lover http://sparrowangelstechnology.blogspot.com
0 Kudos
GreatWhiteTec
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

When you reprotect, you tell the SRA to reverse the mirrors. For example in NetApp you will be sending the resync command with the source filer now being the destination and the destination now being the source. There is more to it, but this is an easy way to understand it.

0 Kudos