Borat_Sagdiev
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

"Tell me why I want to have a separate cluster for View"? - Mr. Customer

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Hello, my name is Mr. Customer.  My VAR is telling me that I shouldn't be running desktop VMs brokered by View on the same hosts and in the same cluster as my server VMs.  Now I know that normally VMware licensing makes it easier to just buy View along with ESX and vCenter, but I haven't followed the rules and actually wound up overbuying some licenses. I haven't violated any EULA points and I want some technical answers why so I can make the right decision and buy some new hardware and make my users' desktops shine.

Signed, Mr.Customer.

Hello, I'm the VAR and I've given my customer some reasons including: better resource sharing, more flexible outage windows, less impact in outage situations, I/O streaming and memory management.  I want to hear it from you guys, what do you think?  The best answers are the ones from our community so let's have 'em and thank you in advance.

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DKatman
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

I don't have the same experience as you all. I am the user like your customer. I do have them separated into two different clusters. I think the biggest point is priority and dedicated resources. I would not want my accounting department's desktops (sending junk email to friends all day) taking up the resources and slowing down my accounting system, my email server, and important functions. Memory seems to be the first resource used up and can pile up with view. In my  Desktop cluster, memory gets sucked up well before any amount of CPU is touched.

At the same time, I do have the thought to let them combine in my DR site so that they can share resources. This is really because I hope to never need that DR side of it but have to have some resources available for it. This would allow me to function (even if handicapped) and have resources available for an interim period.

I am smaller in the sense I do not have a server and a desktop division. I imagine your client doesn't either, or they would not think of combining desktops with servers. And it would really set each arm up for pointing the finger at the other for any issues they have at all.

Dave

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idle-jam
Immortal
Immortal

with view add on license which run on top of the existing vsphere license, you might be wasting enterprise grade hardware and resource for running hardware. also you do not want to mess desktop to screw up the resources or having the server team and desktop team sharing the same infra and etc. with the bundled license, you get vsphere for desktop and everything free with a new setup on a different hardware. at the end of the day it's depending on the total cost and management between these twos.

Borat_Sagdiev
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Good point about accountability between desktop and server teams I-J, but your answer is still mostly about licensing which is not an issue for this client. I'm looking for more technical information.

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mittim12
Immortal
Immortal

I think idle-jam was spot on with a lot of the reasons listed.   The biggest for me is the separation between management groups.  I don't want the desktop team accessing the server vSphere host and vice versa. 

I also think that VDI environments can generate a lot of resource utilization.   If you have your AV solution misconfigured you could easily bring the VDI environment down.  Why take a chance to bring the server environment down with it?  

DKatman
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

I don't have the same experience as you all. I am the user like your customer. I do have them separated into two different clusters. I think the biggest point is priority and dedicated resources. I would not want my accounting department's desktops (sending junk email to friends all day) taking up the resources and slowing down my accounting system, my email server, and important functions. Memory seems to be the first resource used up and can pile up with view. In my  Desktop cluster, memory gets sucked up well before any amount of CPU is touched.

At the same time, I do have the thought to let them combine in my DR site so that they can share resources. This is really because I hope to never need that DR side of it but have to have some resources available for it. This would allow me to function (even if handicapped) and have resources available for an interim period.

I am smaller in the sense I do not have a server and a desktop division. I imagine your client doesn't either, or they would not think of combining desktops with servers. And it would really set each arm up for pointing the finger at the other for any issues they have at all.

Dave

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Borat_Sagdiev
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Dave Wins! Great responses everyone.  Here is what I've summed up including information from my local VMware SEs:

  • Accountability / Desktop vs. Server Teams
  • Resource distraction / View operations such as recomposing, refreshing, vmotion, etc... using otherwise server-centric resources
  • Compatibility issues / View has prevented updates to latest versions of vSphere due to incompatibility issues in the past
  • More effecient density architecture when the cluster if VDI-centric
  • Better memory and I/O management when the cluster is VDI-centric
  • Licensing (a given)
  • Continuity options are more flexible
  • HA is less constrained when the cluster is VDI-focused / less impact to the enterprise should a host fail
  • Security/Safety - intrusion is more isolated

None of these reasons should/would/could prevent a mixed use cluster, it's just a matter of effeciencey and best practice!

Thank you everyone.

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