GlenMarquis2
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Enthusiast

VDI Evaluation

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Hi,

How can I evaluate VDI, I have VI3 already, however, what do I need and where can I get the .ISO / .exe

To have a play....?

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tbrouwer
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If I recall, VDI licensing allows 100 VM's per 16 sockets. That is 6.25 VMs per CPU. With todays processors being dual and quad core, that is not enough in my opinion. Dual Core would get you 3 VMs per core, and quadcore 1.5 per core.

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TomHowarth
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VDI is a ethos not a seperate product. it runs on ESX VI3. it is the virtualisation of the Desktop, as opposed to Server virtualisation.

you may well need a Desktop broker, unless you are going to to 1to1 mappings. there are plenty of these out there, my personal favourite is from Provision

http://www.provisionnetworks.com/solutions/vas/vas.aspx

then all you do is create a XP host or two.

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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GlenMarquis2
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I understand, however I cannot download get hold of an eval as you can for most things from http://www.vmware.com/download/

Is either pre-purchased Download / Buy

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tbrouwer
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Hot Shot

If you have VI3 already, thats all you need.

VDI is just running multiple VMs (normally XP), and having users remotely connect to them (normally RDP).

There is no seperate "download" for VDI.

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TomHowarth
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Glen

Do you have a VI3 infrastructure in place already, if so use that. alternatively register for a trial of VI3 and then download the ISO's it is exactly the same product! VDI refers to a license type. which I believe is restricted to xx desktops per server. (somebody else may be able to confirm or deny this limitation)

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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GlenMarquis2
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I understand that the Desktop OS would be running as a VM on ESX, however I thought there is a management suite, that allows you to manage the VMs at the OS level.

i.e. allow certain machines to have certains applications installed etc.

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TomHowarth
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there is a management portion, but I think it is only available to VIP VAC and vmware consulting. your best bet would be to download a trial of one of the dedicated brokers like Provision VAS, or LeoStream

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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GlenMarquis2
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I see -

So VMware's VDI offering is normal ESX, but the licenses are cheaper agreeing only to use Desktop OS.

I was convinced that VMware had a seperate VDI management suite

Are there any "extra" VDI options enabled in VC once the VDI licenses are install?

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tbrouwer
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Hot Shot

Not that I know of. We didnt even do the VDI licensing because last time I checked the restrictions per CPU just were not workable.

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epping
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Expert

no, VDI is just a marketing term. just install windows xp and rdp to it (thats VDI), a connection broker can be used for more advanced features like vm pools.

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tbrouwer
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

If I recall, VDI licensing allows 100 VM's per 16 sockets. That is 6.25 VMs per CPU. With todays processors being dual and quad core, that is not enough in my opinion. Dual Core would get you 3 VMs per core, and quadcore 1.5 per core.

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TomHowarth
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That was the restriction.

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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