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issueman
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Possible to run macOS Sonoma on deprecated Intel mac?

WMware Fusion Player Version e.x.p (22068932) brings support for macOS Sonoma. Awesome. Now I am wondering, can it create a macOS Sonoma VM when running on a mac, which Apple has deprecated with macOS Sonoma?

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issueman
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Managed to update an existing macOS vm to macOS Sonoma developer preview. Known requirement is a developer Apple ID which is part of Apples's developer program.

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Technogeezer
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It might be possible. I've run a Ventura VM on a Mac mini 2014 which does not have support for Ventura.

I would be cautious about any statement VMware is making about supporting macOS Sonoma. Unless @Mikero (Fusion Product Manager) has pulled off a major miracle, VMware no longer updates VMware Tools for newer versions of macOS. 

In particular, Apple's been making more and more of their applications dependent on Metal 3D graphics support, and the VMware Tools for macOS do not provide adequate support for that . That means that while the core OS may work, some applications may not render correctly, or if at all. There have been reports, for example, that the latest version of Safari may not display correctly in a VM. 

- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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ColoradoMarmot
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The days of MacOS virtualization outside of what Apple directly supports are coming to an end.  Folks should look for alternatives.

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issueman
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Folks? Wow. When you talk about alternatives are you referring to buying an Apple Silicon mac?

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Technogeezer
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Things to consider:

VMware has deprecated support of macOS virtualization on ESX. Since the VMware Tools team is responsible for them across all platforms, no further development is being done. Like I said, unless @Mikero has been able to change some minds.

No new Intel Macs are being sold. M1/M2 only. And Intel VMs won't run on M1/M2 Macs - only on Intel Macs. There's no emulation of an Intel chip avaialble from anyone (and that includes QEMU) that performs well enough to meet the expectations of running an Intel Mac operating system on Apple Silicon.

At some point Apple will drop support for Intel Macs in macOS. They will provide limited security updates for at most 2 more years from the release date of that macOS version, then they will eventually drop off support entirely. Fusion will likely fall off of Intel Mac support as the underlying macOS becomes unsupported from Apple.

So in the not too distant future, deciding to keep running workloads on Intel Mac operating systems will be a community-only effort on legacy hardware with no security updates or help from Apple (or VMware). The alternatives are

  • keep running on Intel Macs, accepting the risks, and adopting "do-it-yourself" mindset to keep things running,
  • finding ways of doing what you want on current Apple offerings, or 
  • Migrating off the Mac platform.
- Paul (Technogeezer)
Editor of the Unofficial Fusion Companion Guides
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ColoradoMarmot
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@issueman wrote:

Folks? Wow. When you talk about alternatives are you referring to buying an Apple Silicon mac?


No, I mean that virtualizing MacOS itself - in any way - is now largely at the mercy of Apple.  Even Parallels just puts a light front end on the Apple API's (which are really rudimentary).  Fusion has depreciated support for the tools, so that's the end of the line over here.  

But beyond that, it's going to come down to either using the built-in functionality that Apple provides (at which point you don't need Fusion or Parallels), or simply not virtualizing MacOS in the future - at all.  Legacy MacOS virtualization will come to an end when Apple retires MacOS support for Intel machines (guessing 2025 or 2026), unless someone wants to run an unsupported host OS on aging hardware.

Whatever use case you have for virtual Mac OS, the net is that it's time to find a non-virtual macos alternative.  If you can't, then find old hardware, and maintain it (and prepare to only use it offline).

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issueman
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Managed to update an existing macOS vm to macOS Sonoma developer preview. Known requirement is a developer Apple ID which is part of Apples's developer program.

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