tlyczko
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

seeking suggestions for "elevator pitch" about why to upgrade/replace old vSphere hosts...

We have two old DL380 G5 ESXi hosts on vSphere 5.0 U3...

They can't 'legally' be upgraded to 5.5 etc.

They are at least 7 years old...

I'm seeking help with creating an 'elevator pitch' about why they should be replaced with newer servers.

I have a bit more than 30 seconds, though.

What I have so far is:

I've been told our servers should be kept up to date despite our company doing a quasi-seim-merger with another company(ies)

These outdated servers no longer support current VMware versions

New servers will be faster, more power efficient (cheaper), easier/faster to manage, better performance

We've spent $75-100k in the past 3-4 years bringing in more updated PCs, why is $15k for two better servers every 5-7 years unjustififiable??

The last point is a bit antagonistic and I can take it out..yet their PCs can do nothing without the servers.

Any/all suggestions for replacing old servers with newer servers would be appreciated...

I did just now learn that 5.0 goes EOL more or less in August 2016...

I'm giving this pitch to quasi-IT people who don't necessarily know a lot about the technical aspects of IT/virtualization and who think a bit more than I do about dollar signs etc.

Thank you, Tom

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11 Replies
bayupw
Leadership
Leadership

I would focus on creating a business justification for server refreshment - not on upgrading the vSphere version.

e.g. the running production servers has reached end of life, and putting us into a risky situation. We depend on unsupported hardware that lacks readily available or any replacement components, etc.

Then if the server refreshment is approved, we can use this opportunity to do vSphere version upgrade as well.

Bayu Wibowo | VCIX6-DCV/NV Author of VMware NSX Cookbook http://bit.ly/NSXCookbook https://github.com/bayupw/PowerNSX-Scripts https://nz.linkedin.com/in/bayupw | twitter @bayupw
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tlyczko
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Unfortunately the particular hardware has an HP Care Pack, which are always sold if HP knows it has parts etc.

Server refreshment is the other way around -- VMware doesn't support it any more beyond 5.0.

I'm looking for good reasons beyond EOL etc. -- the servers work -- but the hypervisor etc. can not be 'legally' upgraded.

Thank you, Tom

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schepp
Leadership
Leadership

Hi Tom,

don't know what vSphere license you use, but usually with every new vSphere version, some of the cool, expensive features hike down in the license level.

So features that required Enterprise license in 5.0 are now included in the Standard license when you update to 5.5, like storage vMotion. Also unlimited vSMP etc.

So in marketing language, you get enterprise features for free! Smiley Wink (features that minimize your planned downtime like storage vMotion)

Maybe it helps

Regards

Tim

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tlyczko
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Sorry for not being more specific -- I am referring to the hardware -- the server hosts -- the above-mentioned DL380 G5 servers are what should be refreshed -- not vSphere...

Thank you, Tom

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Texiwill
Leadership
Leadership

Hello,

WHat is your hardware and utilization of those nodes. If you are experiencing such things has high %CPU ready then your justification is that you are CPU bound and to continue the business you will have to upgrade systems to support minimally  hexacores. I went through this same concern. I have DL380 G5s and they will run the latest code, but they were only quad cores. I had CPU and memory issues as well as networking issues due to the quad cores in use. I went to hexacores and never had a CPU problem again.

If your utilization is bumping the boundaries there is a good use case that has worked in the past. If they are not, then it really is case of you need X feature(s), and without an upgrade X feature(s) will not be available. DL380G5s have capacity issues (memory + CPU) that newer hardware does not suffer. You can only put on some many VMs.

However, I would also find out what will happen during the merge, will you loose your hosts as a general rule or will you keep them. Will your IT assets be moved or not.

It would be a poor business choice if the future is just not there.

Best regards,
Edward L. Haletky
VMware Communities User Moderator, VMware vExpert 2009, 2010, 2011,2012,2013,2014

Author of the books 'VMWare ESX and ESXi in the Enterprise: Planning Deployment Virtualization Servers', Copyright 2011 Pearson Education. 'VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing the Virtual Environment', Copyright 2009 Pearson Education.

Virtualization and Cloud Security Analyst: The Virtualization Practice, LLC -- vSphere Upgrade Saga -- Virtualization Security Round Table Podcast

--
Edward L. Haletky
vExpert XIII: 2009-2021,
VMTN Community Moderator
vSphere Upgrade Saga: https://www.astroarch.com/blogs
GitHub Repo: https://github.com/Texiwill
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tlyczko
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

That was a good reply…thank you…

We are losing some VMs and maybe waiting is the right thing to do…I think maybe I should explain I can not upgrade the hosts and wait for 5.0 EOL in 2016 thereabouts to get new hosts at which time we will probably only need two as we will still have people using apps and VMs within the agency as well as in the new umbrella agency…

Lot of good ideas in your reply, thank you…

Thank you, Tom

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Texiwill
Leadership
Leadership

Hello,

Then if you only need two hosts, I suggest you get two new hosts against the future but make sure you can upgrade from hexa- through dodeca- cores. The DL380G8-V2s can do that. Also, ensure you can add any memory you want. Also ensure they have 420i SCSI cards (or you can add them) for VSAN or other Cache mechanisms for the future. If you have an upgrade path for these two hosts, you will proof against the future, allow vSphere 5.5 w/all features to run AND you have a migration plan from old to new. You can then run the old for quite a while. Once the merge is finished you transition completely to the new nodes.

Just a thought. The technical issues aside, there is really no future in DL380G5s wrt to support (and HP's carepacks just do not count really). if vSphere does not support the HP kit then the carepack is just about useless. HP will tell you the same thing actually. But you need the carepack to get HP involved in support.

Best regards,
Edward L. Haletky
VMware Communities User Moderator, VMware vExpert 2009, 2010, 2011,2012,2013,2014

Author of the books 'VMWare ESX and ESXi in the Enterprise: Planning Deployment Virtualization Servers', Copyright 2011 Pearson Education. 'VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing the Virtual Environment', Copyright 2009 Pearson Education.

Virtualization and Cloud Security Analyst: The Virtualization Practice, LLC -- vSphere Upgrade Saga -- Virtualization Security Round Table Podcast

--
Edward L. Haletky
vExpert XIII: 2009-2021,
VMTN Community Moderator
vSphere Upgrade Saga: https://www.astroarch.com/blogs
GitHub Repo: https://github.com/Texiwill
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tlyczko
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

I've only ever had care packs for hardware problems.

VMware problems have been few and far between fortunately.

Have you heard of the HP P-series controllers??

631681-B21 HP HP 2GB FBWC FOR P SERIES SMART ARRAY

They are flash-backed controllers...

Thank you, Tom

Tom Lyczko

IT Coordinator

www.MountainLakeServices.org

www.EssexIndustries.org

www.MountainWeaversGuild.com

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Texiwill
Leadership
Leadership

Hello,

I would look at the VSAN HCL and pick a SCSI controller from there as those are the blessed ones that can see SSD quite well.

Best regards,
Edward L. Haletky
VMware Communities User Moderator, VMware vExpert 2009, 2010, 2011,2012,2013,2014

Author of the books 'VMWare ESX and ESXi in the Enterprise: Planning Deployment Virtualization Servers', Copyright 2011 Pearson Education. 'VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing the Virtual Environment', Copyright 2009 Pearson Education.

Virtualization and Cloud Security Analyst: The Virtualization Practice, LLC -- vSphere Upgrade Saga -- Virtualization Security Round Table Podcast

--
Edward L. Haletky
vExpert XIII: 2009-2021,
VMTN Community Moderator
vSphere Upgrade Saga: https://www.astroarch.com/blogs
GitHub Repo: https://github.com/Texiwill
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tlyczko
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

I will do that though I don't foresee VSAN in our future for a long time. Smiley Happy Smiley Happy

It requires 3 hosts and the two clusters I'm involved with may not have that many, though I understand about planning for the future,

Thank you, Tom

Tom Lyczko

IT Coordinator

www.MountainLakeServices.org

www.EssexIndustries.org

www.MountainWeaversGuild.com

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Texiwill
Leadership
Leadership

Hello,

I use the VSAN HCL to decide what controllers and SSDs will work best within a vSphere environment, not just for VSAN but other technologies like PernixData, Alantis, SanDisk FlashSoft, etc. There are many options from which to choose, but VMware went through the effort to vet devices that work best within their environment. This work translates to other solutions. So it is worth looking at when choosing any SCSI Controller (not just for VSAN). Just another data point.

Best regards,
Edward L. Haletky
VMware Communities User Moderator, VMware vExpert 2009, 2010, 2011,2012,2013,2014

Author of the books 'VMWare ESX and ESXi in the Enterprise: Planning Deployment Virtualization Servers', Copyright 2011 Pearson Education. 'VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing the Virtual Environment', Copyright 2009 Pearson Education.

Virtualization and Cloud Security Analyst: The Virtualization Practice, LLC -- vSphere Upgrade Saga -- Virtualization Security Round Table Podcast

--
Edward L. Haletky
vExpert XIII: 2009-2021,
VMTN Community Moderator
vSphere Upgrade Saga: https://www.astroarch.com/blogs
GitHub Repo: https://github.com/Texiwill
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