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burdweiser
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resource pool fight for production

So the company I am with now has been using VMware in test and dev for the

last year. They have had a small number of dedicated machines for a particular

app on two production boxes, but nothing else has mixed with those guest

servers. The company opted to purchase three Dell R900's (proc's fully

populated) and 64GB of RAM in each. These are Enterprise licensed.

Here is my dilemma. My boss has heard about resources pools and has some

knowledge of how they work. But, he has heard of other companies totally

botching their production environment (no doubt to misconfiguring) with resource

pools. I have been working with ESX for the last three years and all of my experience

tells me that we need to at least start with a high, medium and low resource

pool for our environment. The company is planning on putting a wide mix of

servers into production. Some require lots of resources and some require

little. Is there any documentation I can use for ammo that will possibly

convince my supervisors that this is the right thing to do? I'm really kinda

stuck right now with just shooting emails back and forth telling management

that it is a really bad idea to roll out production VMware without resource

pools.

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RParker
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Here is my dilemma. My boss has heard about resources pools and has some knowledge of how they work. But, he has heard of other companies totally botching their production environment (no doubt to misconfiguring) with resource pools. I have been working with ESX for the last three years and all of my experience tells me that we need to at least start with a high, medium and low resource pool for our environment.

Opinions are like feet, there are always 2. Nobody will ever agree. your boss 'heard' but has no experience. YOU have the experience, so I would go with that approach. If he hired YOU to do the job, then he should let you do it. Period.

Resource pools are also an option but I use them mainly for management (assign permissions at the pool level, and group VM's by department). We don't manage the CPU / Memory resource.

They can also get you into deep trouble if you don't set them up properly. I agree you shouldn't just stick a bunch of VMs out there without SOME level of control Rather that means high medium or low, that's subjective. Those resource 'shares' will only apply (unless you have reservations) when the ESX host resources are low, so when everything is good, high medium or low, won't make a difference. They will all get equal share of the resource.

Your boss should quit being a micro manager.

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RParker
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Here is my dilemma. My boss has heard about resources pools and has some knowledge of how they work. But, he has heard of other companies totally botching their production environment (no doubt to misconfiguring) with resource pools. I have been working with ESX for the last three years and all of my experience tells me that we need to at least start with a high, medium and low resource pool for our environment.

Opinions are like feet, there are always 2. Nobody will ever agree. your boss 'heard' but has no experience. YOU have the experience, so I would go with that approach. If he hired YOU to do the job, then he should let you do it. Period.

Resource pools are also an option but I use them mainly for management (assign permissions at the pool level, and group VM's by department). We don't manage the CPU / Memory resource.

They can also get you into deep trouble if you don't set them up properly. I agree you shouldn't just stick a bunch of VMs out there without SOME level of control Rather that means high medium or low, that's subjective. Those resource 'shares' will only apply (unless you have reservations) when the ESX host resources are low, so when everything is good, high medium or low, won't make a difference. They will all get equal share of the resource.

Your boss should quit being a micro manager.

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JonRoderick
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Does your boss understand that if and when it comes to resource contention on the hosts (i.e. you're allocating more than you physically have in the host), it'll be 'every VM for itself' and your noddy VMs that are doing very little will be competing equally for the available resource with your business-critical VMs.

Using resource pools will allow you to guarantee resources and prioritise which VMs get access to those resource so there is a hierarchy when it comes to handing out the resources.

I'd stress that resources pools in and of themselves will not save you if you just don't have enough resource in the host - it's a bit of a safety net to save you in a pinch.

Resource pools can also be used for delegating control over different VMs - that's what I find most useful about them.

Jon

Texiwill
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Hello,

I would not role out Production without Resource Pools. Not sure what the scare is by the manager. But resource pools are there to 'limit' VMs from taking all available resources. They are easy to adjust etc.

I use Production Pool, Development, and Infrastructure pools for my systems. This way I can keep Dev from using all the resources and control some basic infrastructure tools under strict control.


Best regards,
Edward L. Haletky
VMware Communities User Moderator, VMware vExpert 2009
====
Author of the book 'VMWare ESX Server in the Enterprise: Planning and Securing Virtualization Servers', Copyright 2008 Pearson Education.
Blue Gears and SearchVMware Pro Blogs -- Top Virtualization Security Links -- Virtualization Security Round Table Podcast

--
Edward L. Haletky
vExpert XIV: 2009-2023,
VMTN Community Moderator
vSphere Upgrade Saga: https://www.astroarch.com/blogs
GitHub Repo: https://github.com/Texiwill
RParker
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your noddy VMs that are doing very little

Did you mean Naughty? New dictionary spelling?

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burdweiser
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We've got plenty of those noddy VM's in our test / dev environment. Parker, I like your way of thinking. I have been planning a meeting with my boss's boss about that very same subject, that I was hired to architect the VMware environment and not just be trumpted by some boss who hears horror stories on how other companies got it wrong. My boss is a super micro manager, he loves the drama.

We would not be using the rescource pools for permission level needs. I want to put them in place so that once the environment grows, we will have some level of control over the resouces. When I explain this to my boss, I get "well, we don't want to limit our VM's because that would make the department heads think they are limited in the resouces they can have". I also get "Ohh, why can't our ESX servers handle the load?". When I try to explain memory overhead on the ESX host when they are wanting me to assigning 12GB of RAM to a web server and how that is bad, it just goes in one ear and out the other. I'm theVMware guy for the company, but I'm stuck sitting on my hands and have no control over the architecture.

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JonRoderick
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haha - if I lived on the west coast maybe but I think noddy is a good way of describing some of our less-critical VMs...

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