samuk
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

ESX 4 Partition Configuration

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Hi,

Does this forum not have a ESX 4 Section?

Configuring two ESX Servers with ESX 4 and Vcentre.

What partitions do i need to create and the sizes as i believe these are different to ESX3.5.

Thanks

Sam

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Gerrit_Lehr
Commander
Commander

Reommenden best practise is:

/

ext3

5.0GB

The / (or “root”) partition stores the

ESX system and all files not stored in another custom partition. If

this partition is filled to capacity, the ESX host could crash. It is

imperative to prevent this.

swap

1600MB

The swap partition is used to supplement RAM if the service console runs out of physical memory.

/home

ext3

512MB

The /home partition is created as a

failsafe to help prevent / from filling up. Service console accounts

(not vCenter) each have an associated /home folder. As a best practice,

administrators should not use these folders for storage. If service

console accounts are to be used and there are multiple users requiring

access, the size of this partition may need to be increased. By

default, /home is part of the / partition. By creating a custom

partition for it the / partition will be protected if /home fills to

capacity.

/tmp

ext3

2.0GB

The /tmp partition is also created as

a failsafe to help prevent filling the / partition. /tmp is often used

to untar support files, temporarily store copied logs and stage

patches. By default, /tmp is part of the / partition. By creating a

custom partition for it the / partition will be protected if /tmp fills

to capacity.

/vmimages

ext3

512MB

Traditionally, /vmimages was used to

store CD-ROM images (.ISOs) and Floppy Disk images (.flp, .img).

However, most organizations following best-practices have moved this

from each individual host to a single shared-storage location. However,

by default ESX creates a /vmimages folder within / . This makes it

dangerously easy for an Administrator to mistake it for the

shared-storage repository and copy images into it that will fill / . As

a failsafe to help prevent this, a small custom /vmimages partition can

be created. If the local /vmimages folder is actually used, this size

may need to be increased.

/var

ext3

2.0GB

The /var partition stores most system

logs. Creating a custom /var partition provides substantial, dedicated

log storage space (/var/log) while protecting the / partition from

being filled by log files. Normally /var is part of the / partition.

/boot

ext3

260MB

/boot stores the files necessary to boot the service console.

vmkcore

100MB

The vmkcore partition temporarily stores log and error information should the VMkernel crash.

From

There is an extra forum for ESX 4 indeed. It's a subforum of vSphere.

Kind Regards,

Gerrit Lehr

If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

Kind regards, Gerrit Lehr If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

View solution in original post

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7 Replies
Gerrit_Lehr
Commander
Commander

Reommenden best practise is:

/

ext3

5.0GB

The / (or “root”) partition stores the

ESX system and all files not stored in another custom partition. If

this partition is filled to capacity, the ESX host could crash. It is

imperative to prevent this.

swap

1600MB

The swap partition is used to supplement RAM if the service console runs out of physical memory.

/home

ext3

512MB

The /home partition is created as a

failsafe to help prevent / from filling up. Service console accounts

(not vCenter) each have an associated /home folder. As a best practice,

administrators should not use these folders for storage. If service

console accounts are to be used and there are multiple users requiring

access, the size of this partition may need to be increased. By

default, /home is part of the / partition. By creating a custom

partition for it the / partition will be protected if /home fills to

capacity.

/tmp

ext3

2.0GB

The /tmp partition is also created as

a failsafe to help prevent filling the / partition. /tmp is often used

to untar support files, temporarily store copied logs and stage

patches. By default, /tmp is part of the / partition. By creating a

custom partition for it the / partition will be protected if /tmp fills

to capacity.

/vmimages

ext3

512MB

Traditionally, /vmimages was used to

store CD-ROM images (.ISOs) and Floppy Disk images (.flp, .img).

However, most organizations following best-practices have moved this

from each individual host to a single shared-storage location. However,

by default ESX creates a /vmimages folder within / . This makes it

dangerously easy for an Administrator to mistake it for the

shared-storage repository and copy images into it that will fill / . As

a failsafe to help prevent this, a small custom /vmimages partition can

be created. If the local /vmimages folder is actually used, this size

may need to be increased.

/var

ext3

2.0GB

The /var partition stores most system

logs. Creating a custom /var partition provides substantial, dedicated

log storage space (/var/log) while protecting the / partition from

being filled by log files. Normally /var is part of the / partition.

/boot

ext3

260MB

/boot stores the files necessary to boot the service console.

vmkcore

100MB

The vmkcore partition temporarily stores log and error information should the VMkernel crash.

From

There is an extra forum for ESX 4 indeed. It's a subforum of vSphere.

Kind Regards,

Gerrit Lehr

If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

Kind regards, Gerrit Lehr If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

View solution in original post

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samuk
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Thanks...

Should i delete the 3 partitions created by default?

swap: 832MB

/var/log: 2GB

/ : 5GB

and only recreate the ones above? do i not need the opt partion anymore?

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Gerrit_Lehr
Commander
Commander

Yes, delete them first and create them according to the recommendations. /opt is part of / in this setup.

Kind Regards,

Gerrit Lehr

If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

Kind regards, Gerrit Lehr If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".
samuk
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Thanks, one last question...

Should this option be selected?

Configure boot loader automatically?

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Gerrit_Lehr
Commander
Commander

Yes, this is ok to select and will cause GRUB to be written to the MBR.

Kind Regards,

Gerrit Lehr

If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".

Kind regards, Gerrit Lehr If you found this or other information useful, please consider awarding points for "Correct" or "Helpful".
DheereshLodhi
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

I am ok with Gerrit!

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Texiwill
Leadership
Leadership

Hello,

Moved to ESX 4 forum.


Best regards,

Edward L. Haletky VMware Communities User Moderator, VMware vExpert 2009, Virtualization Practice Analyst[/url]
Now Available: 'VMware vSphere(TM) and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing the Virtual Environment'[/url]
Also available 'VMWare ESX Server in the Enterprise'[/url]
[url=http://www.astroarch.com/wiki/index.php/Blog_Roll]SearchVMware Pro[/url]|Blue Gears[/url]|Top Virtualization Security Links[/url]|Virtualization Security Round Table Podcast[/url]

--
Edward L. Haletky
vExpert XIII: 2009-2021,
VMTN Community Moderator
vSphere Upgrade Saga: https://www.astroarch.com/blogs
GitHub Repo: https://github.com/Texiwill
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