M4T
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Enthusiast

Connect Thin Client Directly To A Host

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Hi,

Are you able to connect a thin clients Ethernet directly to a Esxi Host instead of having it connected to the network.

how do you set this up?

Mat

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MBreidenbach0
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Tell us more about your setup.

There are many reasons why a VM appears slow/laggy and usually it's not the network. The first things I'd check are CPU overprovisioning and I/O latency first. You can do that via ESXTOP on the ESXi console.

High CPU Ready % and Co-Stop indicates CPU overprovisioning (VM is ready to run but cpu cores are not available)

KAVG/DAVG/GAVG indicate storage latency (KAVG = VMware Kernel, DAVG= storage, GAVG=KAVG+DAVG)

Depending on yout setup the storage just may not provide enough IOPS.

See here for some info about ESXTOP: ESXTOP - Yellow Bricks

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MBreidenbach0
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I probably am but I don't see why I would want to do that.

If I had to do this I'd have to dedicate a uplink to the thinclient connection, create a portgroup, assign it to that uplink, use a dedicated IP range, configure thin client in that IP range and probably require a router VM that routes thinclient traffic to whatever it is supposed to access. If the thin client is supposed to talk to VMs I could add a 2nd NIC to this/these VMs and connect that to the portgroup connected to the thin client. But that probably creates more problems that it solves.

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M4T
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hi,

thanks for the response, what would the best way be as its real slow and laggy my vm.

I have all the right VMware tools installed but its still slow. I find hyper-v quicker on the same connection and setup.

Matt

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MBreidenbach0
Hot Shot
Hot Shot

Tell us more about your setup.

There are many reasons why a VM appears slow/laggy and usually it's not the network. The first things I'd check are CPU overprovisioning and I/O latency first. You can do that via ESXTOP on the ESXi console.

High CPU Ready % and Co-Stop indicates CPU overprovisioning (VM is ready to run but cpu cores are not available)

KAVG/DAVG/GAVG indicate storage latency (KAVG = VMware Kernel, DAVG= storage, GAVG=KAVG+DAVG)

Depending on yout setup the storage just may not provide enough IOPS.

See here for some info about ESXTOP: ESXTOP - Yellow Bricks

View solution in original post

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