ronnutter
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Problems creating a VM

Just started working on ESXi-Arm Fling.  I have tried copying an iso file to the datastore and also having the vm config process use a local iso file.  Neither one is working.  

I am following the same process that I have with big boy ESXi to create a VM.

Is there something different I need to do?

I was starting with Raspberry Pi OS. 

Is there another one I should try ?

Ron

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8 Replies
cyprienlaplace
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

Hi Ron,

Thanks for trying the ESXi-Arm Fling!

Are you following William's post to run the Raspberry Pi OS in a VM?
https://www.virtuallyghetto.com/2020/10/how-to-run-raspberry-pi-os-as-a-vm-on-esxi-arm.html

For any other ISO, be sure to take the "arm64" or "aarch64" versions. ESXi-Arm Fling is not capable of emulating x86 CPUs.

Cyprien

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ronnutter
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Thanks the the reply.  Yes, I am using the Arch version.

Since the underlying hardware isnt x86, didnt think I would be able to implement an x86 based ISO.

Ron

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ronnutter
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Here are the steps I am following -

downloaded arm .img file

Using disk utility on the mac, I convert .img to .cdr

per instructions I have found, I rename .cdr to .iso

 

After installing the vm and starting it up, I see the following -

PXE on IPv4, followed by

PXI on IPv6, followed by both of the http version of the PXE messages I indicated I had also seen.

I have rechecked the ARM Fling PDF and dont see that I missed any steps during installation of ESXi.

Suggestions on next steps to try ?

Like I said in my first message, I am experience with big boy ESXI, so this isnt my first rodeo.

Ron

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cyprienlaplace
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

Can we start with a known ISO image?

https://cdimage.ubuntu.com/releases/20.04/release/ubuntu-20.04.1-live-server-arm64.iso

no need to convert to any other format, just the iso to the virtual CDROM/DVD drive.

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MattGagliardi
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

I can't speak to Pi-centric efforts (in terms of creating a Pi VM on ESXi-ARM) but I've managed to get Ubuntu and CentOS VMs running without any problems.  With regard to uploading ISOs I'd suggest ensuring you're able to perform forward/reverse DNS between the system you're using to upload the ISO and your host...whenever I've had issues with that kind of upload (regardless of ESXi version) it's been either a DNS issue or a certificate trust problem.

EDIT: also possibly worth mentioning...USB (if you're using USB rather than iSCSI or NFS) is probably a lot slower than the storage you're used to.  It can take some time to get an ISO uploaded.

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reefhouse72
Contributor
Contributor

did you ever get a fix for this 

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cyprienlaplace
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

a fix for what?

The link to William's blog above (from @Xeroxxx) is a detailed explanation on how to run Raspberry Pi OS in a VM.

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