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McFaddenAZ68
Contributor
Contributor

Single Core / Dual Core / Quad Core processors P2V -> Workstation 6.x?

Forgive me if this is already a topic, but I am in a time crunch.

If I P2V a QuadCore base physical machine, will I be able to bring up the VM session on a Single core host box using WrkStation 6.x, or does the host need to be as robust as the P2V guest?

In the past, I attempted to P2V a Core 2 Duo and bring it up on a single core host, and I got a lot of errors, beyond the typical "the features of this virtual machine chipset are different....blah blah blah"

I understand lessor guest chipsets being handled by more robust hosts, but wonder if the reverse was true.

thanks,

-mwm

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kucharski
Commander
Commander

Or you will be able to take a quad core processor and make it a single processor running under Workstation 6.x. The only thing that I would do and don't if you did this in the past was change the HAL in the virtual machine once it is a virtual machine. This will make a hugh difference. I actually see this all the time. I have P2V'ed several thousands of machines in my time and I have never had a problem.

Michael

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TomHowarth
Leadership
Leadership

no you require as least as many CPU or Cores as you have in Virtual Machine. therefore if you have a quad CPU machine and convert it with out changing the number of CPU then you will require 4 CPU or Cores to run in a virtualised state.

Tom Howarth

VMware Communities User Moderator

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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TomHowarth
Leadership
Leadership

if you mean, have all four cores appear as one phyiscal CPU of 10Ghz rather than 4 2.5 Ghz cores then no, you can't.

Tom Howarth

VMware Communities User Moderator

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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kucharski
Commander
Commander

No, I wasn't meaning that. I was saying taking 2 physical processors which are quad-core on the physical and then converter it to a single processor whatever the virtualmachine is on the virtual side. If it a single P4 3.6GHZ for an example.

Michael

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theanykey
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

When altering the number of CPUs presented to a Windows operating system, you also need to alter the HAL accordingly or you may experience performance issues.

For more information regarding these performance issues, see High CPU Utilization of Inactive Virtual Machines (1077)

http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1077

Downgrading the HAL from multiprocessor to uniprocessor is not supported by the operating system vendor, Microsoft, and as such it is not supported by VMware.

To check which HAL you have installed in your virtual machine:

1.Right-click on My Computer, and choose Properties.

2.Click the Hardware tab.

3.Click the Device Manager tab.

4.Double-click the Computer icon to see which HAL is currently loaded.

The steps necessary to modify the HAL are dependant on the version of Windows you are running.

Windows XP / Windows 2003

Windows XP Device Manager and Windows 2003 Device manager list limited choices for changing your HAL type when you click Update Driver.

Note: This is done by following the steps given above and right-clicking the current HAL.

For more information, see HAL options after Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 Setup (KB309283).

Link valid 14 Feb 2008. Please rate this article to report any issues with the link.

Windows 2000

The prefered method to change from an ACPI HAL to a Standard HAL is to reinstall Windows 2000 as an upgrade.

Reinstalling the operating system should work to downgrade the HAL.

Note: Downgrading is not supported.

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McFaddenAZ68
Contributor
Contributor

Ok let me clarify my question here.

I have a quad core XEON machine that I need to virtualize. Can I P2V this and open the virtual on my Core 2 Duo Workstation 6.x machine? All I need is the clients environment in which to debug some issue he is having and I want to make sure I can open this virtual machine without needing a "like" host machine.

thanks,

-mwm

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theanykey
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

Shouldnt be a problem.

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oreeh
Immortal
Immortal

Shouldnt be a problem.

Are you sure? Since WS only support vSMP with 2 virtual CPUs he at least would have to downgrade the number of vCPUs.

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theanykey
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

doh!

I read the above incorrectly.

If you want to take a VM from a quadcore host and run the VM on a dualcore host should not be a problem.

If you want to create a VM from a physical quadcore host, you then would need a platform that supports a 4-cpu VM. Workstation/Server/Player/ACE does not support 4-cpu VMs. ESX does.

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McFaddenAZ68
Contributor
Contributor

So I have a quad core xeon -> P2V -> open in workstation 6.x core two duo = no problem? I don't care about retaining the quad core processors, I just need the environment.

I suspect, if this works, I will likely have to reactivate the XP license as the hardware signature has significantly changed.

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oreeh
Immortal
Immortal

Before opening the VM in WS open the VMX file in an editor and adjust the numvcpus parameter to "2". After that you should be fine.

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TomHowarth
Leadership
Leadership

that is suported, but to run the machine you will have to change the number of vCPU you 1, then for performance, change the HAL, and remove unused devices etc.

Tom Howarth

VMware Communities User Moderator

Tom Howarth VCP / VCAP / vExpert
VMware Communities User Moderator
Blog: http://www.planetvm.net
Contributing author on VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment
Contributing author on VCP VMware Certified Professional on VSphere 4 Study Guide: Exam VCP-410
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