TronAr
Commander
Commander

vMotion on AWS

I've found SDDC Network Architecture where it says:

The AWS infrastructure is completely unlike a traditional switched network in that it is not based on MAC-learning. Instead, 100% of all IP/MAC pairs must be explicitly programmed by AWS into the infrastructure. This presents a problem for the SDDC; specifically, when it comes to vMotion. Although the exact nature of the problem is beyond the scope of this document, it is sufficient to understand that each ESXi host utilizes a series of kernel-level (non NSX-managed) virtual routers designed to enable vMotion on top of AWS. These virtual routers are visible in the network path of a VM whenever you perform a traceroute. If you execute a traceroute then you will notice that the interconnects between the NSX edges and the host-level routers (vDR) are utilizing a mix of IPv4 addresses from the reserved ranges for link-local and carrier-grade NAT.

Has anybody some more info on "the nature of the problem" ?

TIA,

-Carlos

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2 Replies
Rick_Star
VMware Employee
VMware Employee

Hi Carlos,

thank you for your question.

We will try to see if we can get you an answer for your question. Please bare with us.

Thank you,
Rick

Rick Hoffmann
Cloud Customer Success Architect - VMware Cloud
VMware Inc.
http://cloudsuccess.blog
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TronAr
Commander
Commander

And that has anything to do with the question at hand ?

vSphere networking on AWS happens on an NSX-T managed overlay, where IP and MAC relation is BAU.

AFAIK, the statement is FUD. Acronym desciphering left as an exercise to the reader 🙂

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