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vhii81
Contributor
Contributor

Vmware data recovery vs vmware consolidated backup

I am just reading up on the new stuff on vmware and am just wondering whats the difference between these two?

It seems so much easier to use vmware data recovery compared to VCB. Perhaps the only difference is the lan-free option?

Thanks

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lamw
Community Manager
Community Manager

Basically VCB will be VMware Data Recovery which will be exposed out as a set of API's called the vStorage API.

I believe VMware said VCB proxy may still be around until vStorage API and the new vDR fully takes over and then purely rely on the vStorage API's or allow 3rd party vendors to hook in to do backup/restores. The standard vcb tools that you may be familiar with on the classic ESX is still available in 4.0 and I guess eventually they'll be phased out and only leveraging vDR or 3rd party that hooks into the vStorage API.

=========================================================================

William Lam

VMware vExpert 2009

VMware ESX/ESXi scripts and resources at:

If you find this information useful, please award points for "correct" or "helpful".

dconvery
Champion
Champion

I believe William is slightly wrong here (I think...sorry William). I am not sure how much I can say, being under NDA. But, from what I have read and seen in the VCDR beta, VCB will still be around. VCDR will be an add-on option to vSphere and is separate from VCB. VCDR seems to me to be a hopped up version of VCB running in hot-add mode. As william said, it plugs into the vStorage API.

VCDR is a backup to disk product for VMs only and does not have an interface to allow for backup to tape. VCB allows you to use the same backup software for your physical servers to back up VMs. This is huge in large environments with critical physical servers. Even though VMware's vision is 100% virtualized servers, there are still Unix and Mainframes out there. Hopefully, VMware see this and doesn't phase VCB out completely.

That being said, VCDR appears to be a great backup tool, with a nice GUI front end that snaps into the vCenter client. It has it own scheduling and de-dupe functionality. The key will be to back up the data once it gets to disk, but it will end up being a full backup every time because of the de-dupe funtionality.

Dave Convery

VMware vExpert 2009

Careful. We don't want to learn from this.

Bill Watterson, "Calvin and Hobbes"

Dave Convery, VCDX-DCV #20 ** http://www.tech-tap.com ** http://twitter.com/dconvery ** "Careful. We don't want to learn from this." -Bill Watterson, "Calvin and Hobbes"
lamw
Community Manager
Community Manager

Hi Dave,

Thanks for the clarification, I was under the impression from some of the info that VCDR will be replacing VCB, perhaps that's not exactly the case. Hopefully the differences/simliarties between the two will be explicit when the product is out but thanks again for your input.

=========================================================================

William Lam

VMware vExpert 2009

VMware ESX/ESXi scripts and resources at:

If you find this information useful, please award points for "correct" or "helpful".

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dconvery
Champion
Champion

Yeah, I read in one of the docs that VCDR is not intending to replace VCB.

Dave Convery

VMware vExpert 2009

Careful. We don't want to learn from this.

Bill Watterson, "Calvin and Hobbes"

Dave Convery, VCDX-DCV #20 ** http://www.tech-tap.com ** http://twitter.com/dconvery ** "Careful. We don't want to learn from this." -Bill Watterson, "Calvin and Hobbes"
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vhii81
Contributor
Contributor

Thanks guys! I just wish they kept it simple and stop creating similar things with different names

Cheers

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petedr
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

In the Consolidates Backup Datasheet posted on the this forum it say the below:

VMware Consolidated Backup supports both VMware ESX

and VMware ESXi versions that have been licensed for

VMware vSphere™ 4 and is included with all editions of

VMware vSphere™ 4

NOTE; With the release of VMware vSphere 4, VMware has

introduced the VMware vStorage APIs for Data Protection

<link to vStorage APIs for Data Protection page> as the

next generation of VMware Consolidated Backup. For more

information, please see the VMware vStorage APIs for

Data Protection Web page <link to vStorage APIs for Data

Protection page>.

www.phdvirtual.com, makers of esXpress

www.thevirtualheadline.com www.liquidwarelabs.com
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dconvery
Champion
Champion

The page 3 of the FAQ sheet from the beta forum says this:

"VMware Data Recovery is not the replacement product for VCB. Both products wil co-exist.":

Dave Convery

VMware vExpert 2009

Careful. We don't want to learn from this.

Bill Watterson, "Calvin and Hobbes"

Dave Convery, VCDX-DCV #20 ** http://www.tech-tap.com ** http://twitter.com/dconvery ** "Careful. We don't want to learn from this." -Bill Watterson, "Calvin and Hobbes"
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jjahns
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

My take on this is that vDR was made with the premise that people are phasing tapes out. As more and more people have more than 1 datacenter (primary and secondary), tapes have little purpose anymore. That coupled with the strict requirements of recovery times, have made vDR a more feasible approach to backup of virtual machines.

It all depends on your requirements.

What we are going to do is use vDR to backup the virtual machines, then use VCB to backup the vDR appliance once a week to tape.

Currently testing this functionality right now.

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John_Hoover
Contributor
Contributor

I for one will be very interested to hear about your results of that testing. We use NetBackup, and while the built-in integration with VCB makes it a lot easier than the old scripting methods, it also seems to scatter the log files a bit more and make it more difficult to find out what's causing problems when they come up. Deduped disk backups to a vAppliance, then backing that appliance up using 3rd party software to write to tape seems like the best of both worlds at this point. Who knows where we'll be in 6 months!

Please post back regarding your testing and any caveats you've found, if you don't mind!

Thanks in advance!

John

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AlbertWT
Virtuoso
Virtuoso

Hm.. sounds interesting using VDR,

Can we backup the VDR backup destination or even the VDR VM itself to make the D2D2T backup process ?

I wonder if there is any advantege to backup theVDR into offsite location of the backed up VM could not be write to the tape drive ?

Kind Regards,

AWT

/* Please feel free to provide any comments or input you may have. */
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jjahns
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

So here's some preliminary results on this.

Using CIFS to backup to a windows share, you technically do not even need VCB to backup the deduplicated data off to tape. The speed, on our environment, did not change that much using CIFS, but all environments are different.

I for one like this method of backup for the VMs. Its integrated with vCenter. Meaning my boss only goes to 1 interface to test the viability of a backup by performing a "restore rehearsal."

I do not like the fact that there are a few limitations on this method of backup. I believe that this is on purpose, and VMware will possibly intend to package this as a separate and expensive add-on for vSphere. Granted I could be wrong, but that is my opinion on the matter. Either way, this is something that, once they work out most of the kinks and provide file-level restore capabilities that are built-in to vCenter, will probably put most methods of backing up virtual machines to shame. The concept and methods are there.

Overall, happy with this. Have not had any major issues so far.

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ben_ayling
Contributor
Contributor

Vmware data recovery takes advantage of the new vStorage API's. However if your have ESX4 Standard version or ESX4 Essentials, it wont work. You need to have ESX4 Advanced, Enterprise, Enterprise Plus or Essentials Plus to get it. See here.

http://www.vmware.com/products/vsphere/buy/editions_comparison.html

VCB works with any version (except free ESXi of course)

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chadwickking
Expert
Expert

Hey Folks,

I dont mean to bring up a dead conversation but how does this work with other applications like SQL and active directory.  I recall going through fast track they covered this.  I also think they called it something like quescing the VM to allow for a backup of databases and such.  Usually this is something that MS provides how to do.  I believe this prevents problems with possible data corruption due to the snap shot process. It sounds to me as well that they are getting away from file level but we still use this extensively in our environment.  I know one way to do a file level is just restore a snapshot of the VM to a backup VM and copy the file over.  Your input is appreciated!

Regards,

Chad King

VCP 4

Cheers, Chad King VCP4 Twitter: http://twitter.com/cwjking | virtualnoob.wordpress.com If you find this or any other answer useful please consider awarding points by marking the answer correct or helpful
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jjahns
Enthusiast
Enthusiast

Don't mean to dig up graveyard posts, but you can quiesce MSSQL and Informix for that matter with good scripts that halt I/O during snapshot creation.

Smiley Happy    

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