0 Replies Latest reply on Jun 18, 2008 3:56 PM by JohnTroyer

    Check your config; pushing performance limits; VMware Stage Manager: Communities Podcasts #5 & #4

    Master

      Every week, a gang of overactive VI admins and community moderators phones in to a secret location somewhere in California. An hour of discussion ensues. My contribution mostly consists of saying "Um", but in between that there is a lot of good information to be had. The last two weeks have been especially good.

       

      VMware Communities Podcast #5

      From the show notes at: http://blogs.vmware.com/vmtn/2008/06/check-your-conf.html where you can get the links mentioned in this week's podcast.

       

      This week's VMware Communities Roundtable was jam-packed with virtualized goodness and no filler, additives, or high-fructose corn syrup.

       

      First up was Robert DiFalco, TripWire's CTO of Products, to talk about the new TripWire ConfigCheck. Next we had VMware's own Scott Drummonds, who talked about pushing VI to extreme limits, both with a record number of Exchange mailboxes on one physical server, and with carrying out 100,000 I/O operations per second on a Very Big disk array. Yes, you can do that in a virtual machine.

       

      Thanks again to all of our panel of experts from the VMware Communities.

       

      Last week's podcast

      VMware Communities Podcast #4

      Links and notes availble at http://blogs.vmware.com/vmtn/2008/06/stage-manager-.html

       

      The VMware Communities Roundtable crew assembled again this morning. This week, our topic was the recently released Stage Manager and our guest was Eddie Dinel, Stage Manager's product manager. Stage Manager, if you're not familiar with it, is Lab Manager's younger cousin, but dedicated to staging and rolling-out the sets of VMs that comprise your business applications. You might think you can do it with snapshots and careful testing and bookkeeping of which linked clone is going where, and which set of servers have what patch on them, but Stage Manager does more and you're much less likely to screw it up. With a 60-day eval, it's worth checking out.

       

      We also had special conference correspondent Scott Lowe phoning in a report from Microsoft's Tech-Ed.