5 Replies Latest reply on Nov 9, 2019 8:03 PM by daphnissov

    Getting started with vsphere on Linux or Windows

    raleysm Novice

      I'm using version 6.7 and wondering if it will be an easier install, config and maintenance to put vsphere on a Windows installation instead of Linux. Would this be true or any comments about using Linux as I find my current installation on Linux seems to have alot of issues. Thanks

        • 1. Re: Getting started with vsphere on Linux or Windows
          daphnissov Guru
          Community WarriorsvExpert

          vSphere is a bundling of two products: vCenter and ESXi. It sounds like you're asking about vCenter. If that's the case, the only one you should consider is the Linux-based appliance as it's the only path forward.

          • 2. Re: Getting started with vsphere on Linux or Windows
            Amin Masoudifard Expert

            VMware's overall approach is to bring everything into the Linux platform. ESX and ESXi are two hypervisors of VMware infrastructure and both of them are Linux-based (ESX is deprecated after vSphere 5.1). As you may know vCenter server as the primary component of virtual infrastructure management, but in the older versions it was only on the Windows platform, but by the publishing of the appliance-based vCenter (VCSA) you will see this approach once again. Also in every version fo vSphare that both platforms (WIN/Linux) are supported, many of new feature is released just for the appliance. For example, vCenter HA is released on vSphere 6.5 just for appliance-based (VCSA)

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            • 3. Re: Getting started with vsphere on Linux or Windows
              daphnissov Guru
              Community WarriorsvExpert

              NathanosBlightcaller I need to correct some misinformation here. First, neither ESX nor ESXi are or were ever based on Linux. This is a common misconception because people think if it has SSH and tools like ls that it must be Linux. Please read this article: https://www.v-front.de/2013/08/a-myth-busted-and-faq-esxi-is-not-based.html

               

              Second, ESX had its last release at 4.1 and not 5.1. This is not deprecation but is end-of-life.

              • 4. Re: Getting started with vsphere on Linux or Windows
                Amin Masoudifard Expert

                Thanks, daphnissov to correct my mistyping of ESXi version (the ESXi latest version is 4.1)

                But about your mentioned link on https://www.v-front.de is a personal opinion, many people comment on that post and they don't believe like this, however, ESX is not just a simple SSH and some Linux tools. Service Console of ESX is derived from the Linux system, many directory structures, file system, and log files are Linux-like (just in comparison to the other OS platform, not exactly that I want to say it's a Linux!). But about the ESXi, yes it's NOT a Linux (just because if we see a bash shell!). It uses VMkernel, not the Linux kernel, that's right

                Please mark my comment as the Correct Answer if this solution resolved your problem
                • 5. Re: Getting started with vsphere on Linux or Windows
                  daphnissov Guru
                  Community WarriorsvExpert

                  Although that article was written by one person, yes, in it is not expressed an opinion. The idea that ESX(i) is not Linux is provable fact, not a legendary tale subject to personal beliefs. Because ESX Classic had a service console which *did* run Linux (which was only for diagnostic purposes) does not mean the hypervisor was itself Linux. And because the directory structures and log files look similar to those found in many Linux distributions is, likewise, not proof it is Linux. ESX(i) is not now nor was it ever a form of Linux regardless of the beliefs you may hold.