4 Replies Latest reply on Oct 13, 2011 11:51 PM by danimeli

    Alarms (vm on disk and vm snapshot GB)

    danimeli Novice

      Hi,

       

      Have configured alarm for datastore usage on vcenter to apply  to all datastores.

       

      Questions:

      a. I have also configured vm snapshot on disk GB to monitor if a vm are running from a snapshot, i have configured it on top in vcenter, but i am a bit worried if i activate it that it will cause performance impact. Should it be ok ta activate this one without any worries? And will it also note if a wm are running from snapshot before this alarm was configured

       

      b. I would also like to monitor usage on vmdk can find the option in GB  but not in %. If it is possible to check a vmdk for all vms running on all my hosts without too big impact. Can anyone please explain the recommended way to set it up...

        • 1. Re: Alarms (vm on disk and vm snapshot GB)
          Virtualinfra Master

          a. You can apply it there wont be any problem, because the vcenter save all the information in the database. alarm is triggered with the information in the database and not by contacting directly the datastore, so there wont be any performance issue.

           

          b. Please be clear, bit confusing, as far as i understood you want to set a monnitoring in vcenter for all the individual VM's VMDK, if there is a option to monitor that you cal always set it up- but i am not sure about it. Also let know the version vcenter you using.so that a option can be given.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Alarms (vm on disk and vm snapshot GB)
            danimeli Novice

            Thank you for your quick answer

             

            Yes i would like to now if i can create an alarm for all individuals Vms VMDK if possible, instead of using tools within the OS (like Microsoft FSRM and so on)

             

            We are using vCenter 4.1.0 Essential licens

            • 3. Re: Alarms (vm on disk and vm snapshot GB)
              shishir08 Hot Shot

              Alarms can be configured at various levels of the VMware host, VM, datacenter, and cluster level.
              VMware  Virtual Center alarms are something you edit in the Alarms Tab inside a  VMware Virtual Infrastructure Client (VI Client) that is connected to a  Virtual Center host.

               

              Before  you create a new alarm,what I would suggest that  there are already  some default alarms created. Those alarm descriptions will start with  the words “default alarm”. Here are the current default alarms:

               

              As  you can see from the name and descriptions of these alarms, these  default alarms are there to both monitor host and virtual machines. The 3  default alarms for hosts will alarm on
              1) ESX lost host connections,
              2) high ESX host CPU utilization,
              and 3) high ESX host memory utilization.

               

              The  2 default alarms for virtual machines will alarm on 1) high virtual  machine CPU utilization and 2) high virtual machine memory utilization.

               

              IF  these alarms do not suffice to your requirement then in that case you  can create a new alarm with your specification and give your email  address for notofication.

               

              follow this link for details.

               

              http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1018029

               

              follow this useful doc .

               

              http://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-12145

              • 4. Re: Alarms (vm on disk and vm snapshot GB)
                danimeli Novice

                Thanks,

                 

                Perhaps the recommended way is not to monitor VMDKs storage usage with alarms? I cannot find any options to do it with %.....

                 

                Any tips how to do this the recommended wmware way would be much appreciated