VCO integration to View (Example)

Version 1

    Did you know you could use VMware Orchestrator to manage VMware View pools? Then again why bother?

     

    Here are a couple of not so real world examples of why you’d want to.

    • Self-Provisioned self-service View pool.
    • Schedule pool entitlements
    • Schedule pool power management

     

  • Ok, now that I could justify why, I had to figure out if I could.  Keep in mind that is very rough, but it did work.
    • Enable WinRM on the View Manager, by following the instructions on the PowerShell plugin documentation page. You will find this under “Supported Communication Protocol”, “Configure WinRM to Use HTTP”
    • Add the View Manager host to the VCO.
      • In VCO, Library -> PowerShell ->Configuration->Add a PowerShell host
    • Run a sample PowerShell cmdlet to verify you can actually talk to the host.
      • In VCO, Library -> PowerShell ->Samples -> List directory content
    • Create a Folder off the root, called “View 5”. We will save our newly created Workflow there
    • Since View uses PowerCLI, we need to generate a workflow that imports “com.vmware.library.powershell”. In this example we’ll just get a list of the View VC’s
      • In VCO, Library -> PowerShell -> Generate -> Generate an action for a PowerShell cmdlet.

    GenerateWorkflow.png

    • Run through the wizard. I choose “com. vmware.library.powershell.generated” as the module. Not sure if this is the right one, but it worked.

    GenerateAction.png

     

    • In VCO, go to your View 5 folder and rename the Workflow to something a bit more meaningful. I choose “Get View VC”.
    • Run the new Workflow.  You only need to set the host field.  Monitor log output (Schema ->Logs).  If everything works, you should be rewarded with an output similar to this.

    GetVC.png

     

    There you go. We can now run View PowerCLI cmdlets in VCO.  In the next article, I’ll show you how to create a new pool from VCO.